Font Size
A
A
A
1
...

Testicular Pain

Testicular Pain Overview

Men become very concerned and anxious when they feel pain in their testicles. To better understand the various causes of this symptom, an understanding of basic anatomy and the development of the testicles is necessary.

  • Before birth, the testicles are located in the abdomen (belly). Eventually, the testicles migrate down through the abdomen into the scrotum (the outside pouch that contains the testicles). However, they remain connected to the abdomen by the spermatic cord, which contains vital blood vessels, nerves, lymphatic vessels, and the vas deferens. The spermatic cord also functions to suspend the testicles within the scrotum.
  • On the upper, outer, back position of the testicle lies a connected but separate structure called the epididymis, which serves to store and transport sperm. Normally, the epididymis has a direct connection to the wall of the scrotum.

Picture of the Male Urinary and Reproductive Structures

Picture of the Male Urinary and Reproductive Structures

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 10/7/2013

Must Read Articles Related to Testicular Pain

Testicular Cancer
Cancer of the Testicle Testicular cancer is an abnormal growth of cells in the testicles. The testicles are the male reproductive organs (gonads), where sperm are produced. The ...learn more >>
Testicular Torsion
Testicular Torsion Testicular torsion is a painful condition caused by the twisting of the spermatic cord, which causes a loss of blood flow to the testicle. It is a surgical emer...learn more >>

Patient Comments & Reviews

The eMedicineHealth doctors ask about Testicular Pain:

Testicular Pain - Effective Treatment

What treatment was effective for your testicular pain?

Testicular Pain - Causes

What caused your fatty liver?

Testicular Pain - Symptoms

What were the symptoms of your testicular pain?





Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Testicular Trauma »

Despite the vulnerable position of the testicles, testicular trauma is relatively uncommon.

Read More on Medscape Reference »


Medical Dictionary