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Trichomoniasis (cont.)

Trichomoniasis Causes

Trichomoniasis is caused by Trichomonas vaginalis, a flagellated motile protozoan.

  • Approximately 174 million people worldwide are infected with this parasite each year, making it the most common curable sexually transmitted infection worldwide. In the U.S., it is estimated that bout 3.7 million people have the infection. Only about 30% of these people will have any symptoms.
  • The average size of a trichomonad is 15 mm (they are not visible with the naked eye).
  • Reproduction of the parasites occurs every 8 to 12 hours.
  • Trichomonas vaginalis was isolated in men in 14% to 60% of male partners of infected women and in 67% to 100% of female partners of infected men. It is unclear why women are infected more often than men. One possibility is that prostatic fluid contains zinc and other substances that may be harmful to trichomonads.
Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 3/26/2013
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Trichomoniasis is a sexually transmitted infection caused by the protozoa Trichomonas vaginalis.

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