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Trisomy 18 (Edwards Syndrome) (cont.)

Can Trisomy 18 Be Inherited?

Most cases of trisomy 18 are not inherited, but occur as random events during the formation of eggs and sperm. An error in cell division called nondisjunction results in a reproductive cell with an abnormal number of chromosomes. For example, an egg or sperm cell may gain an extra copy of chromosome 18. If one of these atypical reproductive cells contributes to the genetic makeup of a child, the child will have an extra chromosome 18 in each of the body's cells.

Mosaic trisomy 18 is also not inherited. It occurs as a random event during cell division early in embryonic development. As a result, some of the body's cells have the usual two copies of chromosome 18, and other cells have three copies of this chromosome.

Translocation trisomy 18 can be inherited. An unaffected person can carry a rearrangement of genetic material between chromosome 18 and another chromosome. This rearrangement is called a balanced translocation because there is no extra material from chromosome 18. Although they do not have signs of trisomy 18, people who carry this type of balanced translocation are at an increased risk of having children with the condition.

Synonyms and Keywords

REFERENCE:
Genetics Home Reference. "Trisomy 18." U.S. National Library of Medicine. 23 Jan. 2012. <http://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/trisomy-18>.


Last Editorial Review: 1/31/2012



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