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Types of Acne


Topic Overview

The different types of acne include:1, 2

  • Newborn acne. About 20% of newborns develop mild acne. This may be because certain hormones are passed to them through the placenta by their mothers just before delivery. Or newborns may get acne because the stress of birth may cause the baby's body to release hormones. Newborns with acne usually only have whiteheads. And these go away without treatment.
  • Infantile acne. Babies between 3 and 16 months of age may develop infantile acne. They can have blackheads and pimples at the same time. Infantile acne usually clears up by the time the child is 2 years old. The pimples rarely leave scars. Infantile acne may be caused partly by higher-than-normal hormone levels.
  • Acne vulgaris. The most common type of acne is acne vulgaris. It appears most often in teens and young adults.
  • Acne conglobata (cystic acne). Acne conglobata is a rare but serious form of acne that occurs mainly in young men. In acne conglobata, deep pimples develop on the face, chest, back, upper arms, and thighs. This type of acne can be hard to treat and often leaves scars. Acne conglobata may last well into adulthood.
  • Acne fulminans. Acne fulminans is a severe form of acne conglobata that occurs in teen boys. In acne fulminans, a large number of pimples develop very quickly on the teen's back and chest. These pimples often leave severe scars. Pimples do not usually develop on the teen's face. Teens with acne fulminans often have a fever and also muscle and bone pain.

Related Information

References

Citations

  1. Habif TP (2010). Acne, rosacea, and related disorders. In Clinical Dermatology: A Color Guide to Diagnosis and Therapy, 5th ed., pp. 217–263. Philadelphia: Mosby.

  2. Zaenglein AL, et al. (2008). Acne vulgaris and acneiform eruptions. In K Wolff et al., eds., Fitzpatrick's Dermatology in General Medicine, 7th ed., vol. 1, pp. 690–703. New York: McGraw-Hill Medical.

Credits

ByHealthwise Staff
Primary Medical ReviewerKathleen Romito, MD - Family Medicine
Specialist Medical ReviewerAlexander H. Murray, MD, FRCPC - Dermatology
Last RevisedFebruary 3, 2011

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