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Understanding Allergy and Hay Fever Medications (cont.)

Corticosteroid Nasal Sprays

Examples of corticosteroid nasal sprays include beclomethasone (Beconase, Vancenase), budesonide (Rhinocort), flunisolide (Nasalide, Nasarel), fluticasone (Flonase), mometasone (Nasonex), ciclesonide (Omnaris), fluticasone furoate (Veramyst), and triamcinolone (Nasacort). Corticosteroid nasal sprays are available by prescription only and are currently the most effective treatment for relief of allergic rhinitis (hay fever).

  • How corticosteroid nasal sprays work: These drugs decrease inflammation within the nasal passages, thereby relieving nasal symptoms.


  • Who should not use these medications: Individuals who are allergic to any components of these nasal sprays should not use them.


  • Use: Gently shake the container. Blow the nose to clear the nostrils. Close (pinch) one nostril, and insert nasal applicator into the other nostril. Inhale through the nose and press on the applicator to release the spray. Apply the prescribed number of sprays and repeat with the other nostril.


  • Side effects: These sprays may cause nosebleed or sore throat.

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