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Understanding Bladder Control Medications (cont.)

Beta Agonists

This class of medication, mirabegron (Myrbetriq), works by relaxing the bladder muscle during the storage phase, thus increasing the capacity of bladder to hold more urine. They can be used for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB). Mirabegron (Myrbetriq) is the first drug in this category.

  • How beta-agonist drugs work: They work by relaxing the bladder muscles and reducing bladder overactivity.
  • Who should not use this medication: Individuals with the following conditions should not use mirabegron or a similar class of drugs:
  • Side effects of mirabegron include: elevation of blood pressure, urinary retention (inability to fully empty the bladder), dry mouth, inflammation of nasal passages, and constipation
  • Use: Mirabegron can be taken orally with or without food. It should be taken whole without crushing or chewing.
  • Drug or food interactions: Patients should inform their doctor if they are taking any other medications for leaky bladder. Certain medications actions and side effects can be enhanced if combined with mirabegron. For example, chlorpromazine, desipramine, digoxin, encainide, flecainide, metoprolol, nortriptyline, pimozide, propafenone, tetrabenazine, or thioridazine may have an increased risk of their side effects when combined with mirabegron.

Other Bladder Control Medications

If symptoms of urinary incontinence are thought to be caused by an enlarged prostate, different medications can be offered to reduce these symptoms. The prostate gland wraps around the urethra (the urinary outlet from the bladder), and if it is enlarged, it could squeeze the urinary passage tight, making the emptying of bladder more difficult and incomplete.

In brief, the following categories are available for the treatment of urinary symptoms caused by an enlarged prostate (prostatic hypertrophy):

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 2/3/2015
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