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Vanadium

IN THIS ARTICLE

Are there any interactions with medications?



Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Vanadium seems to decrease blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking vanadium along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.

Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.



Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs)
Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.
Talk with your health provider.

Vanadium might slow blood clotting. Taking vanadium along with medications that also slow clotting might increase the chances of bruising and bleeding.

Some medications that slow blood clotting include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), diclofenac (Voltaren, Cataflam, others), ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), naproxen (Anaprox, Naprosyn, others), dalteparin (Fragmin), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

Dosing considerations for Vanadium.

The following doses have been studied in scientific research:

BY MOUTH:
  • People get vanadium from food and from supplements. An average diet provides 6 to 18 mcg of vanadium per day. The various vanadium supplements contain a different amount of vanadium, depending on the chemical compound used. For example, vanadyl sulfate contains 31% elemental vanadium; sodium metavanadate contains 42% elemental vanadium; and sodium orthovanadate contains 28% elemental vanadium.
  • The National Institute of Medicine has set the tolerable upper intake level (UL) of vanadium, the highest intake amount for which no unwanted side effects are expected, at 1.8 mg per day of elemental vanadium for adults. No UL has been set for infants, children, and pregnant or breast-feeding women. In these groups, vanadium intake should be limited to food or infant formula.

Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

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Report Problems to the Food and Drug Administration

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit the FDA MedWatch website or call 1-800-FDA-1088.






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