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Whiplash (cont.)

Whiplash Causes

The most frequent cause of whiplash is a car accident. The speed of the cars involved in the accident or the amount of physical damage to the car may not relate to the intensity of neck injury; speeds as low as 15 miles per hour can produce enough energy to cause whiplash in occupants, even when they wear seat belts.

  • Other common causes of whiplash include contact sport injuries and blows to the head from a falling object or being assaulted.
  • Strains of the neck from sudden changes in direction, for example, roller coasters, minor bicycle accidents, or slips and falls can all cause whiplash.
  • Repetitive stress injuries or chronic strain involving the neck (such as using the neck to hold the telephone) are common, non-acute causes.
  • Child abuse, particularly the shaking of a child, can also result in this injury as well as in more serious injuries to the child's brain or spinal cord.

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Patient Comments & Reviews

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Whiplash - Symptoms

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Whiplash - Causes

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Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Cervical Sprain and Strain »

Cervical strain is one of the most common musculoskeletal problems encountered by generalists and neuromusculoskeletal specialists in the clinic.

Read More on Medscape Reference »


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