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Bleeding Overview

Minor bleeding episodes are common, easy to treat, and have no long-term consequence. Major bleeding can be very dangerous. Significant bleeding can occur in many situations, even underwater or in the wilderness. Accidental cuts, lacerations, or puncture wounds from sharp objects could cause extensive bleeding. Extensive bleeding can cause a drop in; and decreased organ blood flow, which could lead to shock. Always check a person who is bleeding for other injuries such as a significant head injury, fractures, or dislocations.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 12/22/2014
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Hemorrhage Definition

Hemorrhage: Bleeding or the abnormal flow of blood.

The patient may have an internal hemorrhage that is invisible or an external hemorrhage that is visible on the outside of the body. Bleeding into the spleen or liver is internal hemorrhage. Bleeding from a cut on the face is an external hemorrhage.

The term "hemorrhagic" comes from the Greek "haima," blood + rhegnumai," to break forth = a free and forceful escape of blood.

SOURCE: Hemorrhage.

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