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Wilderness: Sea Urchin Puncture (cont.)

Authors and Editors

Author: Barbara Drobina, DO

Editor: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

Previous contributing authors and editors: Author: Joseph Kaplan, MD, FACEP, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, Department of Emergency Medicine, Medical Center of Central Georgia.

Editors: N Stuart Harris, MD, MFA, Staff Physician, Department of Emergency Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Francisco Talavera, PharmD, PhD, Senior Pharmacy Editor, eMedicine; James Kimo Takayesu, MD, Staff Physician, Department of Emergency Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital/Massachusetts General Hospital.

Views/opinions expressed in this article are not those of the United States Navy.


Last Editorial Review: 4/7/2008

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Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Echinoderm Envenomation »

The phylum Echinodermata includes a diverse group of marine animals that are slow moving and nonaggressive, including brittle stars (class Ophiuroidea), starfish (class Asteroidea), sea urchins (class Echinoidea), and sea cucumbers (class Holothuroidea).

Read More on Medscape Reference »


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