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What is a Seizure?

Seizure Symptoms

  • Symptoms range from jerking movements in a single extremity to abnormal movements throughout the entire body.
  • Some seizures may cause lip smacking, behaviorisms, staring spells, or other symptoms depending on in which area of the brain the seizure cause originates.
  • Seizures may affect bladder and bowel control, and a person experiencing a seizure often bites his or her own tongue.
Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 12/28/2015
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Seizure - Treatment

What kind of treatment have you received for a seizure or seizures?

Generalized Seizures in Epilepsy

Epilepsy that causes generalized seizures is more common in children than in adults. Unlike partial seizures, which begin in a specific, often damaged area in the brain, generalized seizures cannot be traced to a specific location or focus. The abnormal electrical activity that causes seizures begins over the entire surface of the brain. And these seizures tend to affect the entire body.

Epilepsy that causes generalized seizures may have no known cause (idiopathic), or it may result from another condition (symptomatic). Drug therapy is the usual treatment approach. But surgery may be helpful in some cases.

Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Seizures in the Emergency Department »

Seizures are a common cause of visits to the emergency department (ED).

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