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Wounds and Wound Care

Wound Care Facts

  • The skin is a barrier to the outside world protecting the body from infection, radiation, and extremes of temperature.
  • There are many types of wounds that can damage the skin including abrasions, lacerations, rupture injuries, punctures, and penetrating wounds.
  • Many wounds are superficial requiring local first aid including cleansing and dressing.
  • Some wounds are deeper and need medical attention to prevent infection and loss of function, due to damage to underlying structures like bone, muscle, tendon, arteries and nerves.
  • The purpose of medical care for wounds is to prevent complications and preserve function. While important, cosmetic results are not the primary consideration for wound repair.
  • Animal and human bites should always be seen by a medical professional because of the high rate of infection.
  • It is important to know a person's tetanus immunization status (for example, has the person had a tetanus shot or booster vaccine in the last 5 years?) so that it can be updated with a tetanus booster if needed.
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Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Wound Care »

This article discusses the management of chronic wounds. This topic is naturally diverse and far-reaching.

Read More on Medscape Reference »


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