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Yeast Infection Skin Rash (cont.)

What Is the Treatment for a Yeast Infection Skin Rash?

A wide array of treatment options are available to treat candidiasis. Options include creams, lotions, tablets or capsules, troches (lozenges), and vaginal suppositories or creams. Talk to a doctor to find the option that is right for you.

What Types of Doctors Treat Yeast Infection Skin Rashes?

Yeast infections may be treated by a family practitioner or internist. Women who have vaginal yeast infections may be treated by a gynecologist. Children who have a yeast infection may see their pediatrician. Oral thrush may be treated by a dentist. Severe cases of skin yeast infections may be treated by a dermatologist. If symptoms are severe, you may go to a hospital emergency department where you will be seen by an emergency medicine specialist. Rarely, an infectious-disease and/or a critical-care specialist may help treat the most severe infections.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 1/12/2016

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Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Candidiasis, Chronic Mucocutaneous »

Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by recurrent or persistent superficial infections of the skin, mucous membranes, and nails with Candida organisms, usually Candida albicans.

Read More on Medscape Reference »


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