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Can Hashimoto’s Disease Be Cured?

  • Medical Author:
    Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C)

    Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) is an Attending Physician with the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism and Associate Director of Clinical Research, Recruitment and Phenotyping with the Center for Androgen Related Disorders, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center.

  • Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD
    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD

    Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.

Ask Can Hashimoto’s Disease Be Cured Related Articles

Ask the Doctor

My doctor recently sent me to an endocrinologist to run some tests after I complained of fatigue, muscle aches, and some unexplained weight gain. Ultimately, I was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. I don’t like the idea of being on hormone replacement therapy forever. Is there any way to get rid of this thyroid disease? Can Hashimoto’s disease be cured?

Doctor's Response

The outlook for those with Hashimoto's thyroiditis is good. While long-term thyroid hormone replacement therapy will likely be needed, with regular blood tests and monitoring of symptoms, side effects are minimal and the long-term prognosis is good.

If there is no evidence of hormone deficiency and only antibodies tests are positive, the use of medications is one that must be discussed in detail by the patient and doctor.

Other medical conditions, patient preference, and the presence of symptoms are all taken into consideration in determining a treatment plan.
If thyroid hormone deficiency is noted on blood tests, the treatment involves daily dosing of a synthetic form of thyroid hormone. This is typically in the form of levothyroxine, which is synthetic T4 (Levothroid, Levoxyl, Synthroid).

Oral medications can restore hormone levels and reverse the symptoms of hypothyroidism, but they must be taken regularly and over the long term. Dosing is adjusted based on blood levels. Levels are usually checked every 6-12 weeks when the medication is actively being adjusted, and 6-12 months thereafter once

Side effects of taking too much thyroid replacement therapy are similar to those of hyperthyroidism, and may include

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Reviewed on 10/1/2018
Sources: References
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