©2018 WebMD, Inc. All rights reserved. eMedicineHealth does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. See Additional Information.

Symptoms and Signs of Cluster Headache FAQs

Doctor's Notes on Cluster Headache FAQs

Cluster headache is an uncommon condition characterized by short-lived attacks of sudden, severe pain that is usually one-sided and occurs in clusters, usually at the same time of day or night for several weeks. Episodic cluster headaches occur in periods (clusters) lasting from one week to one year, separated by headache-free intervals lasting at least two weeks. Chronic cluster headaches occur for more than one year without remission or with remissions lasting less than 2 weeks.

Symptoms of cluster headaches include intense pain that comes on without warning and peaks around 5 to 10 minutes from when the headache first begins, and then the pain continues at peak intensity for up to three hours. The pain is generally described as excruciating, explosive, deep, and/or piercing (but usually not throbbing), like an ice pick is being driven into the eye. The stabbing eye pain can feel like an electrical shock. Cluster headache pain often begins in the eye and always on one side of the face. Other symptoms of cluster headaches include stuffy and runny nose on the same side as the pain around the eye, watery eyes, increased blood flow to the membranes lining the eyeball and the inside of the lids, facial sweating, eyelid swelling, complete or partial Horner syndrome (a condition causing ptosis [eyelid closure], change in pupil size on one side of the face, and lack of sweating) that may persist between attacks, and fast heartbeat.

Medical Author: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP
Medically Reviewed on 3/21/2019

REFERENCE:

Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015.

CONTINUE SCROLLING FOR RELATED ARTICLE