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Daffodil

What other names is Daffodil known by?

Coucou, Jeannette, Jonquille, Jonquille Sauvage, Lent Lily, Narciso, Narcisse Jaune, Narcisse des Prés, Narcisse Trompette, Narcissus, Narcissus pseudonarcissus, Paquette.

What is Daffodil?

Daffodil is a plant. The bulb, leaf, and flower are used to make medicine.

Despite serious safety concerns, people take daffodil for whooping cough, colds, and asthma. They also take it to cause vomiting.

Some people apply a piece of cloth spread with a daffodil bulb preparation (plaster) to the skin to treat wounds, burns, strains, and joint pain.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...



TAKEN BY MOUTH APPLIED TO THE SKIN AS A PLASTER
  • Wounds.
  • Burns.
  • Strains.
  • Joint pain.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of daffodil for these uses.

How does Daffodil work?

Daffodil contains chemicals that help reduce pain. Daffodil is also being studied for possible use in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

Are there safety concerns?

Daffodil is UNSAFE for use. Merely chewing on the stem may be enough to cause a chill, shivering, and fainting. Daffodil can cause irritation and swelling of the mouth, tongue, and throat. Daffodil can also cause vomiting, salivation, diarrhea, brain and nerve disorders, lung collapse, and death.

People who handle daffodil plants or bulbs can have skin swelling and irritation.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It's UNSAFE to take daffodil by mouth or apply it to the skin if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Don't use it.

Dosing considerations for Daffodil.

The appropriate dose of daffodil depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for daffodil. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

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Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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Reviewed on 6/18/2019
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