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progesterone vaginal (Crinone, Endometrin, FIRST-Progesterone VGS 100)

Brand Names: Crinone, Endometrin, FIRST-Progesterone VGS 100, FIRST-Progesterone VGS 200, FIRST-Progesterone VGS 25, FIRST-Progesterone VGS 400, FIRST-Progesterone VGS 50, Prochieve

Generic Name: progesterone vaginal

What is progesterone vaginal?

Progesterone is a female hormone important for ovulation and menstruation. Progesterone causes changes in the lining of your uterus, making it easier for a fertilized egg to attach to the uterus at the beginning of pregnancy. Progesterone then helps your body maintain the pregnancy.

Progesterone vaginal (for use in the vagina) is used to cause menstrual periods in women who have not yet reached menopause but are not having periods due to a lack of progesterone in the body.

Progesterone vaginal is also used in fertility treatment as part of Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) for women unable to get pregnant due to a lack of natural progesterone in the body.

Progesterone vaginal is also used to prevent overgrowth in the lining of the uterus in postmenopausal women who are receiving estrogen hormone replacement therapy.

Progesterone vaginal may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What are the possible side effects of progesterone vaginal?

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Call your doctor at once if you have:

Common side effects may include:

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What is the most important information I should know about progesterone vaginal?

You should not use this medicine if you have: a history of stroke or blood clot, circulation problems, liver disease, breast or uterine cancer, abnormal vaginal bleeding, or if you have recently had a tubal pregnancy or an incomplete abortion.

Some forms of vaginal progesterone may contain plant-based oils. Tell your doctor if you have any type of food allergy.

Do not use if you are pregnant, unless you are using progesterone as part of your fertility treatment.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using progesterone vaginal?

You should not use progesterone vaginal if you have ever had an allergic reaction to it, or if you have:

  • a history of stroke, blood clot, or circulation problems;
  • breast or uterine cancer;
  • abnormal vaginal bleeding;
  • liver disease;
  • any type of food allergy (some forms of vaginal progesterone may contain plant-based oils); or
  • if you have recently had a tubal pregnancy or an incomplete or "missed" abortion.

To make sure this medicine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have:

Using progesterone vaginal can increase your risk of blood clots, stroke, heart attack, or breast cancer. Talk to your doctor about this risk.

Do not use progesterone vaginal if you are pregnant, unless you are using this medicine as part of your fertility treatment.

Tell your doctor if you become pregnant during treatment. If you are not being treated for infertility, use effective birth control to prevent pregnancy while using progesterone vaginal.

Progesterone vaginal can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I use progesterone vaginal?

Follow all directions on your prescription label. Do not use this medicine in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Do not take by mouth. Progesterone vaginal is for use only in the vagina.

Insert this medicine directly into the vagina using only the applicator provided. Use a disposable applicator only once and then throw it away.

Progesterone vaginal suppositories are made at the pharmacy and provided in a special container. Your pharmacist can show you how to remove a suppository from the container. Avoid handling the suppository too long or it will begin to melt in your hand.

Read all patient information, medication guides, and instruction sheets provided to you. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

Use this medicine at bedtime if it causes dizziness or drowsiness.

Progesterone vaginal is sometimes given for only 6 to 12 days at a time. When used as part of fertility treatment, progesterone vaginal may be given for up to 12 weeks into a pregnancy. Follow your doctor's dosing instructions very carefully.

Have regular physical exams and self-examine your breasts for lumps on a monthly basis while using progesterone vaginal.

If you need surgery or medical tests or if you will be on bed rest, you may need to stop using this medicine for a short time. Any doctor or surgeon who treats you should know that you are using progesterone vaginal.

It is normal to have vaginal discharge for several days after using this medicine. Talk with your doctor if you have concerns about any vaginal discharge.

Store progesterone vaginal inserts or gel at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light.

Progesterone vaginal suppositories should be stored in a refrigerator. Follow the instructions provided with your medicine.

QUESTION

Vaginal yeast infections are caused by bacteria. See Answer

What happens if I miss a dose?

Use the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

Call your doctor if you miss more than one dose.

What happens if I overdose?

An overdose of progesterone vaginal is not expected to be dangerous. Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222 if anyone has accidentally swallowed the medication.

What should I avoid while using progesterone vaginal?

Do not use another vaginal medicine within 6 hours before or after using progesterone vaginal gel. Use only vaginal products that your doctor has recommended.

Avoid using vaginal yeast treatments unless your doctor tells you to.

This medicine may impair your thinking or reactions. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert.

What other drugs will affect progesterone vaginal?

Other drugs may interact with progesterone vaginal, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use now and any medicine you start or stop using.

Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist can provide more information about progesterone.


Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.
Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

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Reviewed on 2/6/2020

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