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Electrolytes

Question:

What conditions have you experienced from having too many or too few electrolytes? Submit Your Comment

Comment from: Joyce, 65-74 Female (Patient) Published: September 15

I went to the emergency room with imbalance, headache, and hurt all over. I lay in that emergency room for 8 hours while they tried to diagnose me. The longer I lay there, the worse I got. By the time I told them I was hearing things they decided to transfer me to another hospital. I heard them tell the drivers to hurry but doubted I would make it that far. They never called my husband. He thought I was just spending the night. I was put in intensive care. The doctors were pushing high doses of potassium, and blood testing constantly. Now I have my electrolytes checked often. While I was in hospital I contracted a virus which I got from my port that was receiving blood tests, etc. I had to be treated for that and almost died again.

Comment from: Jay, 65-74 Male (Patient) Published: July 29

I have leg, pelvic and lower back pain because of too few electrolytes. I need to start on electrolyte food and liquid.

Comment from: Mickey, 55-64 Male (Caregiver) Published: May 18

My husband took hour-long, hot baths for three months while sipping ice water in the tub. One day he started having leg cramps but ignored them until the cramps almost paralyzed him and he finally called for help. I called 911 and they took him to the ER. His muscles were so cramped up he couldn't talk and was in agony for a couple hours until his blood test came back and they put him on potassium overnight. He was back to normal levels the next day, but has some minor loss of kidney functions. Now his electrolytes can get out of balance easily and he has to be careful of drinking too much water or eating too little salt or he feels confused and weak.

Comment from: bayamesa, 65-74 Female (Patient) Published: March 08

I was admitted to the ER with numbness in my left arm and it turned out to be very low electrolytes. Magnesium to be exact. After receiving a couple of IVs of magnesium the numbness is gone. Thank God it had nothing to do with my heart.

Comment from: kali, 55-64 Male Published: February 29

Several hours after intensive exercise I develop a headache and feeling of nausea. I do have electrolytes in my energy drink but the exercise leads to depletion. In the hours after exercise, as a result of significant liquid intake, my electrolyte levels drop causing the above symptoms. I now take electrolytes in post exercise drinks. I have a low sodium diet and this could be exacerbating the problem.

Comment from: kizziesmom, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: July 20

My doctor said I have low electrolytes, but didn't tell me what to do to get them up. He just said not to sweat, (I told him I don't) and said to use Sea Salt. I have, for about 2 years, he said not to drink so much water. I'm down to about 8 glasses a day. He also said to drink G2 which I did, but had to quit, as I am severely sensitive to Citric Acid. I'm thinking about getting Endurolyte.

Medically reviewed by John A. Daller, MD; American Board of Surgery with subspecialty certification in surgical critical care

REFERENCE:

Goldman, Lee, MD, and Denny Ausiello, MD. Cecil Textbook of Medicine. 23rd edition. Saunders Elsevier. 2008

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