©2018 WebMD, Inc. All rights reserved. eMedicineHealth does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. See Additional Information.

Symptoms and Signs of Eye Injuries: Pictures, Types, Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

Doctor's Notes on Eye Injuries: Pictures, Types, Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

Eye injuries can be minor, such as getting soap in an eye, to loss of vision or loss of the eye. Eye injuries can occur anywhere - at home, in the workplace, from other accidents, or while participating in sports.

Symptoms of eye injures depend on the type of injury. Symptoms of eye injures due to chemical exposure include pain or intense burning, profuse tearing, eye redness, and swollen eyelids. Symptoms of eye injures due to subconjunctival hemorrhage (bleeding) include a red spot of blood on the sclera (the white part of the eye). Symptoms of eye injures due to corneal abrasions include pain, a sensation that something is in the eye, tearing, and sensitivity to light. Symptoms of eye injures due to iritis include pain, light sensitivity, and excessive tearing. Symptoms of eye injures due to hyphema (bleeding in the eye) include pain and blurred vision. Symptoms of eye injures due to orbital blowout fracture include pain, especially with movement of the eyes; double vision that disappears when one eye is covered; and eyelid swelling which may worsen after nose blowing; numbness of the upper lip on the affected side; and swelling around the eye and bruising (black eye). Symptoms of eye injures due to conjunctival lacerations include pain, redness, and a sensation that something is in the eye. Symptoms of eye injures due to lacerations to the cornea and the sclera include decreased vision and pain. Symptoms of eye injures due to foreign bodies in the eye include a sensation that something is in the eye, tearing, blurred vision, light sensitivity, decreased vision, eye pain, double vision or decreased vision. Symptoms of eye injures due to light-induced injuries include pain, light sensitivity, redness, an intense feeling something is in the eye, and decreased vision with a small area of central blurring.

Medical Author: John P. Cunha, DO, FACOEP
Medically Reviewed on 3/11/2019

REFERENCE:

Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015.

CONTINUE SCROLLING FOR RELATED SLIDESHOW