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Great Plantain

What other names is Great Plantain known by?

Common Plantain, Erva-De-Orelha, General Plantain, Grand Plantain, Greater Plantain, Llantén, Plantago asiatica, Plantago major, Plantago Mayor, Plantain, Plantain à Bouquet, Plantain Commun, Plantain à Feuilles Larges, Plantain Majeur, Plantain des Oiseaux, Tanchagem.

What is Great Plantain?

Great plantain is a plant. The leaves and seed are used to make medicine. Be careful not to confuse great plantain with buckhorn plantain, water plantain, or other similar sounding medicines.

Great plantain is used for bladder infections, bronchitis, colds, and irritated or bleeding hemorrhoids. It is also used to kill germs and reduce swelling.

Some people apply great plantain directly to the affected area for skin conditions or eye irritation.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • Common cold. Early research suggests that taking great plantain might help reduce the symptoms of the common cold.
  • Ongoing (chronic) bronchitis. Developing evidence suggests that taking great plantain might help treat chronic bronchitis.
  • Bladder infections.
  • Hemorrhoids.
  • Skin conditions, when applied to the skin.
  • Eye irritation, when applied to the eye.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of great plantain for these uses.

How does Great Plantain work?

Great plantain contains substances which might help decrease pain and swelling (inflammation), decrease mucous (phlegm) production, and open airways. It might also be able to kill bacteria and fungi.

Are there safety concerns?

Great plantain seems to be safe when taken by mouth by most adults. But it may cause some side effects including diarrhea and low blood pressure.

It might be UNSAFE to apply great plantain to the skin. It can cause allergic skin reactions.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: It's UNSAFE to use great plantain if you are pregnant. Great plantain can affect the uterus and might increase the chance of having a miscarriage.

Not enough is known about the safety of using great plantain if you are breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Melon allergy: People who are allergic to melons might also be allergic to great plantain. Avoid use if you have this type of allergy.

Plantain allergy: Avoid using great plantain if you are allergic to any member of the plantain family.

Are there any interactions with medications?


Warfarin (Coumadin)Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.Talk with your health provider.

Great plantain contains large amounts of vitamin K. Vitamin K is used by the body to help blood clot. Warfarin (Coumadin) is used to slow blood clotting. By helping the blood clot, great plantain might decrease the effectiveness of warfarin (Coumadin). Be sure to have your blood checked regularly. The dose of your warfarin (Coumadin) might need to be changed.

Dosing considerations for Great Plantain.

The appropriate dose of great plantain depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for great plantain. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

QUESTION

Next to red peppers, you can get the most vitamin C from ________________. See Answer

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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Reviewed on 9/17/2019
References

Garcia Ortiz JC, Cosmes Martin P, Lopez-Asunsolo A. Melon sensitivity shares allergens with Plantago and grass pollens. Allergy 1995;50:269-73. View abstract.

Holetz FB, Pessini GL, Sanches NR, et al. Screening of some plants used in the Brazilian folk medicine for the treatment of infectious diseases. Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz 2002;97:1027-31. View abstract.

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