How Does a Person Get Sarcoidosis?

Reviewed on 6/24/2021

Sarcoidosis is a rare inflammatory condition that produces clumps of inflammatory cells (noncaseating granulomas) typically in the lungs and lymph nodes in the chest cavity. The cause of sarcoidosis is unknown. It may be genetic, or possibly triggered by bacteria, viruses, or chemicals.
Sarcoidosis is a rare inflammatory condition that produces clumps of inflammatory cells (noncaseating granulomas) typically in the lungs and lymph nodes in the chest cavity. The cause of sarcoidosis is unknown. It may be genetic, or possibly triggered by bacteria, viruses, or chemicals.

Sarcoidosis is a rare inflammatory condition in which clumps of inflammatory cells (called noncaseating granulomas) form in the body, most commonly in the lungs and lymph nodes in the chest cavity. It can also affect the heart, eyes, skin, and nervous system

It is unknown how a person gets sarcoidosis. It is thought there may be a genetic component, or that bacteria, viruses, or chemicals may trigger the disease.

Risk factors for developing sarcoidosis include:

  • Environment
    • Working in dusty or moldy environments
  • Ethnicity
    • People of African and Scandinavian descent are at higher risk
  • Gender
    • More common in women
  • Age
    • More commonly develops in people between 20 to 40 years of age

What Are Symptoms of Sarcoidosis?

Symptoms of sarcoidosis depend on the extent and severity of organ involvement, and may include:

How Is Sarcoidosis Diagnosed?

Symptoms of sarcoidosis are similar to many other conditions. If sarcoidosis is suspected, the following tests may be indicated: 

What Is the Treatment for Sarcoidosis?

Sarcoidosis treatment depends on the severity of the disease and which organs are involved. Treatment is aimed at managing symptoms and improving organ function. Patients with mild symptoms may not need treatment. 

Treatment for sarcoidosis may include:

  • Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for joint pain and rheumatologic symptoms 
  • Corticosteroids for lung inflammation
  • Other non-steroid medications
  • Rehabilitation programs

In rare cases, patients with advanced lung scarring (pulmonary fibrosis) from sarcoidosis may need oxygen therapy lung transplantation. 

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Reviewed on 6/24/2021
References
http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/301914-overview

https://www.lung.org/lung-health-diseases/lung-disease-lookup/sarcoidosis/learn-about-sarcoidosis

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4326053/

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/pulmonary-sarcoidosis