Additional Conditions

Picture of Lamellar Ichthyosis Arms

Picture of Lamellar Ichthyosis Arms

Lamellar ichthyosis is a rare genetic condition that affects the skin. Infants affected by Lamellar ichthyosis are generally born with a shiny, waxy layer of skin (called a collodian membrane) that is typically shed within the first two weeks of life. The skin beneath the collodian membrane is red and scaly. Other signs and symptoms of the condition may include ectropion, lips that turn outwards, hair loss, palmoplantar hyperkeratosis (thick skin on the palms of the hands and/or soles of the feet), nail abnormalities, dehydration and respiratory problems. Although the condition may be caused by changes in one of several different genes, approximately 90% of cases are caused by genetic changes in the TGM1 gene. Lamellar ichthyosis is generally inherited in an autosomal recessive manner.

Image Source: Reproduced with permission from ┬ęDermNet NZ www.dermnetnz.org 2022
Text Source: Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center