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Is 120 Blood Sugar Normal?

Reviewed on 11/4/2020

What Are Normal Blood Sugar Levels?

A healthy blood sugar level depends on a person's age, physical condition and when they last ate. For some people with diabetes, a blood sugar measurement of 120 is on the high end of normal. For people without this condition “normal” is lower -- under 100 except right after meals.
A healthy blood sugar level depends on a person’s age, physical condition and when they last ate. For some people with diabetes, a fasting blood sugar measurement of 120 is on the high end of normal. For people without this condition “normal” is lower -- under 100 except right after meals.

Normal blood sugar levels differ depending on a person’s age and other health conditions. 

In people who do not have diabetes, normal blood sugar ranges are:

  • Fasting/upon waking and before meals: 80 to 99 mg/dL
  • After meals/before bed: 80 to 140 mg/dL

It is important for people with diabetes to manage blood sugar levels to prevent complications from the disease. 

For adults who have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, and children who have type 1 diabetes, normal blood sugar ranges are:

  • Fasting/upon waking and before meals: 80 to 130 mg/dL
  • After meals/before bed: Less than 180 mg/dL

For pregnant women who have pre-existing diabetes, normal blood sugar ranges are:

  • Fasting/upon waking and before meals: 60 to 99 mg/dL
  • After meals/before bed: 100 to 129 mg/dL

For pregnant women who have gestational diabetes, normal blood sugar ranges are:

  • Fasting/upon waking and before meals: less than 96 mg/dL
  • After meals/before bed: less than 120 mg/dL

What Are Some Ways to Help Manage Blood Sugar Levels?

Ways to help keep blood sugar levels in check include: 

  • Eating a healthy diet 
    • Consuming plenty of vegetables and fruits
    • Choosing foods low in calories, saturated fat, trans fat, sugar, and salt
    • Drinking water instead of juice or soda
    • Limiting alcohol
    • Eating fruit for dessert
  • Maintaining a healthy weight
  • Getting regular exercise
  • Tracking blood sugar levels if you are diabetic to see what makes them go up or down
  • Eating at regular times, and not skipping meals
  • Tracking food, drink, and exercise
  • Controlling food portions 

SLIDESHOW

Diabetes: What Raises and Lowers Your Blood Sugar Level? See Slideshow

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Reviewed on 11/4/2020
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