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Jambolan

What other names is Jambolan known by?

Badijamun, Black Plum, Duhat, Eugenia cumini, Eugenia jambolana, Indian Blackberry, Jaman, Jambol Tree, Jambolan, Jambolan Plum, Jambolao, Jambose, Jambosier, Jambu, Jambul, Jamelongue, Jamelonguier, Jamum, Java Plum, Jumbul, Kavika Ni India, Mahajambu, Mesegerak, Phadena, Plum, Prune de Java, Rajajambu, Rose Apple, Syxygii Cumini Cortex, Syzygium cumini, Syzygium jambolanum, Syzygium jambos.

What is Jambolan?

Jambolan is a tree. The seed, leaf, bark, and fruit are used to make medicine.

Jambolan is widely used in folk medicine for diabetes.

It is also used for digestion disorders including gas (flatulence), bowel spasms, stomach problems, and severe diarrhea (dysentery).

Another use is treatment of lung problems such as bronchitis and asthma.

Some people use jambolan as an aphrodisiac to increase interest in sexual activity, and as a tonic.

In combination with other herbs, jambolan seed is used for constipation, diseases of the pancreas, stomach problems, nervous disorders, depression, and exhaustion.

Jambolan is sometimes applied directly to the mouth and throat to reduce pain due to swelling (inflammation). It is also applied directly to the skin for skin ulcers and inflammation of the skin.

Possibly Ineffective for...

  • Diabetes (jambolan leaf). There is some evidence that drinking jambolan tea prepared from 2 grams jambolan leaves per liter of water does not improve fasting blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. However, research in animals suggests that the seed and bark might lower blood sugar, but this effect has not been shown in people. Other research suggests that jambolan seed might also lower cholesterol in people who have high cholesterol due to diabetes. But again, this benefit has not been shown in people.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • Bronchitis.
  • Asthma.
  • Severe diarrhea (dysentery).
  • Intestinal gas (flatulence).
  • Spasms.
  • Stomach problems.
  • Increasing sexual desire (aphrodisiac).
  • Constipation, in combination with other herbs.
  • Exhaustion, in combination with other herbs.
  • Depression, in combination with other herbs.
  • Nervous disorders, in combination with other herbs.
  • Pancreas problems, in combination with other herbs.
  • Skin ulcers, when applied to the skin.
  • Sore mouth and throat, when applied to the affected area.
  • Skin swelling (inflammation) when applied to the skin.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of jambolan for these uses.

How does Jambolan work?

Jambolan seed and bark contains chemicals that might lower blood sugar, but extracts from jambolan leaf and fruit don't seem to affect blood sugar. Jambolan also contains chemicals that might protect against oxidation damage, as well as chemicals that reduce swelling.

Are there safety concerns?

Jambolan is POSSIBLY SAFE for most people when taken by mouth in usual medicinal amounts.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of jambolan during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Diabetes: Jambolan seed and bark extracts might lower blood sugar levels. Monitor blood sugar levels closely if you have diabetes and take jambolan.

Surgery: Jambolan might lower blood sugar levels. There is some concern that it might interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgery. Stop using jambolan at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

QUESTION

Next to red peppers, you can get the most vitamin C from ________________. See Answer

Are there any interactions with medications?


Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs)Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.Talk with your health provider.

Jambolan seed and bark extracts might decrease blood sugar levels. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking jambolan seed or bark along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to be too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.

Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

Dosing considerations for Jambolan.

The appropriate dose of jambolan depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for jambolan. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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Reviewed on 9/17/2019
References

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Muruganandan S, Srinivasan K, Chandra S, et al. Anti-inflammatory activity of Syzygium cumini bark. Fitoterapia 2001;72:369-75. View abstract.

Oliveira AC, Endringer DC, Amorim LA, et al. Effect of the extracts and fractions of Baccharis trimera and Syzygium cumini on glycaemia of diabetic and non-diabetic mice. J Ethnopharmacol 2005;102:465-9. View abstract.

Pepato MT, Mori DM, Baviera AM, et al. Fruit of the jambolan tree (Eugenia jambolana Lam.) and experimental diabetes. J Ethnopharmacol 2005;96:43-8. View abstract.

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Sridhar SB, Sheetal UD, Pai MR, Shastri MS. Preclinical evaluation of the antidiabetic effect of Eugenia jambolana seed powder in streptozotocin-diabetic rats. Braz J Med Biol Res 2005;38:463-8. View abstract.

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Teixeira CC, Pinto LP, Kessler FH, et al. The effect of Syzygium cumini (L.) skeels on post-prandial blood glucose levels in non-diabetic rats and rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus. J Ethnopharmacol 1997;56:209-13. View abstract.

Teixeira CC, Rava CA, Mallman da Silva P, et al. Absence of antihyperglycemic effect of jambolan in experimental and clinical models. J Ethnopharmacol 2000;71:343-7. View abstract.

Teixeira CC, Weinert LS, Barbosa DC, et al. Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care 2004;27:3019-20. View abstract.

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