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Low Potassium (Hypokalemia)

Question:

What were the symptoms of your low potassium (hypokalemia)? Submit Your Comment

Comment from: Ggg, 25-34 Female (Patient) Published: November 01

Fatigue, panic, feeling of indigestion, insomnia, weakness, low blood pressure, palpitations, confusion, and dizziness were my symptoms of low potassium.

Comment from: Smalm, 19-24 Female (Patient) Published: October 08

My symptoms of hypokalemia were a fluttering feeling in my chest like my heart was not beating properly, and tingling extremities.

Comment from: Glenda , 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: September 12

I just found out that my potassium was very low. The doctor told me earlier it was my thyroid and I had been taking medication for 3 months. I still felt weak and tired. I have pain in my legs, grogginess, foggy brain, and pain in my chest. So I decided to go see a specialist for thyroid, and went to see her. She checked and told me I don't have thyroid problems, I have low potassium. So I have been taking the wrong medications for 3 months! Thanks to this doctor I will survive.

Comment from: sheriwag, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: May 16

Dizziness, profuse sweating, exhaustion, severe cramping, and weakness were my symptoms of low potassium.

Comment from: WonderfulLife, 25-34 Female (Patient) Published: April 20

I had a chest trauma a couple of years ago, and since then I have been hypokalemic. I am 27. It all started with very severe heart palpitations. I saw my doctor and we found out that I was relatively low, I don't remember the number. I have been on 10 mEq of potassium for a year now and rarely get the heart palpitations, but I constantly seem to have back spasms, which are really affecting my work and overall health. I haven't really had any other side effects other than lethargy, muscle weakness, and severe heart palpitations. My doctor tells me it is from the trauma I received a couple of years ago, but I am not done trying to figure it all out.

Comment from: Glynn, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: June 14

I have been experiencing funny feelings maybe from hypokalemia, they are very hard to explain. They are like a flushed feeling going up around my head and also a bad taste. I am also feeling hot around my head. I do have heart and kidney failure. I just want to know what these feelings could be.

Comment from: Yvette, 35-44 Female (Patient) Published: March 06

I suffer from hypokalemia. Originally it was blamed on excessive vomiting (related to a neuro disease). At this point vomiting is under control, but despite oral and IV potassium supplement, my levels keep dropping. Today it was 2.7. It's been lower. So far my heart rhythm has always been normal, which seems to reduce the urgency of the medical care I have been receiving. I'm exhausted; slept 15 hours yesterday, I fatigue quickly, my arms and legs feel like they are asleep (burning/tingling), and when my levels drop, I get confused. It's hard to keep a line of thought, also hard to speak coherently. I'm currently taking 120 mEq liquid potassium daily, yet nothing seems to be working. I've been hospitalized, and they have seen firsthand the lack of logic in why my levels keep dropping despite the high level of supplementation. At 2.7, I was literally sent home today because my EKG was normal.

Comment from: Aquarius 57, 35-44 Female (Patient) Published: November 30

I became ill over a 24-day period with what an inept physician told me was a stomach flu that turned out to be hypokalemia. I was 42 years of age. First, after one week of feeling sick, my legs became very weak as my blood pressure was fairly low. The second week, I thought I was getting better because I was able to eat and keep down fluids. In the third week, I got much worse. I didn't realize it then but I lost touch with reality to a point. I had been falling when getting up during the night to use the washroom. It would take me up to two hours of trying to get myself back on my feet and it didn't occur to me that this was highly abnormal. I just thought, 'wow, I must be tired!' When speaking to friends the following day, I didn't even think to tell them about what had happened the prior night. This became a nightly occurrence; falling and taking hours to get back up. I was becoming more out of touch with my condition and was much weaker each day. A friend I spoke to every day began to ask me to go the emergency room, but I didn't think it was that bad. On night 24, I got up and in my mind, I needed to count the number of hairpins I had! I kept losing count and it became harder to keep standing. I ended up falling to the floor and in my numerous attempts to get up, I pulled down a piece of fabric covering my night-stand and with it came three glasses of beverages which I was going to try to drink that night. The glass shattered all over the floor and I kept trying to get up on the broken glass! I was impervious to pain and didn't realize my hands, legs, and feet were cut up and bleeding or perhaps I didn't care. At some point, I gave up and fell asleep on the broken glass on the floor. By 2:30 the next afternoon, I was still on the floor. I was going to call for help but didn't have the strength to get up, unlock my apartment door and take the chain lock off the door so somebody could get in. After another 3 hours and falling asleep, I was now on the floor right beside my apartment door. I jolted awake and I figured I would just need to get my neighbor to come to my place and help. I had a few seconds of strength to hoist myself up enough to grab onto the door handle and pull myself up. I very quickly unlocked the door, took off the chain lock, and then I fell back to the floor. Using a caterpillar type of motion, I slid on my back to the telephone, pulled it to the floor and luckily remembered my speed dial. My neighbor finally convinced me to go to the hospital and called an ambulance, and when I arrived, my friends, who followed me there, were told that I was much too ill to be seen. I barely remember them doing EKGs over and over again, being hooked up to some sort of heart machine and hours later, I was admitted to the heart unit. The physician assigned to me told me very early in the morning that my potassium had 'bottomed out' and that I had no vitamins in my blood. For the first 10 days, I couldn't speak properly, it was all jumbled, I couldn't brush my hair, too confused to punch in a phone number on the phone in my room, couldn't pour my own juice in a glass because I kept missing the glass and spilling juice all over, and so weak, I was unable to move or get up. The friends who saw me told me that my catheter bag that held my urine was the color of Coca-Cola. I had ultrasounds a few times on my kidneys but barely remember them because I was asleep and still much too weak to move. I had to learn how to eat all over again and how to dress myself too. I was released from the hospital still very confused but I was able to make it the rest of the way. It took another 6 to 9 months before I felt fully recovered. I hope you remember this if you ever have these symptoms. You may 'think' that falling and taking two hours to get back up again is a minor weakness or an incident from being too tired, but please, call an ambulance! Your life is at risk.

Comment from: Landshark, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: November 07

I had been experiencing gastrointestinal (GI) issues and every once in a while, after eating bread, I would have a day of loose stools. I stopped eating bread but the GI issues continued (acid reflux, fullness after eating small amounts). Family has a history of gallstones but I went to the doctor and had that ruled out and was prescribed Prilosec. A month or so after GI issues started, I began to experience calf cramps (not unusual since I run) and then hamstring cramps, which I had never experienced until then. I started feeling more tired and would take naps when I got home from work. Every once in a while I would feel slightly nauseous but I thought it was because of all of the cruciferous vegetables I'd added to my diet recently. One day at work, I was extremely thirsty and drank smoothies, water, and juices but couldn't quench the thirst. I felt a weird hot flash, followed by dizziness and nausea (kind of like when you get the flu) but I knew it was way more serious. I had someone call an ambulance and my beats per minute (BPM) were 220 by the time the emergency medical technicians (EMTs) arrived. It felt like I was having a panic attack but I knew it wasn't. I got to the emergency room (ER) and about five minutes later, had a torsades de pointes episode and flat lined. The fabulous ER team was able to resuscitate me after 15 minutes so there was, luckily, no permanent damage. It turns out my potassium was 2.3 and my magnesium was also low, which the doctors believe caused the Torsades. We cannot figure out why my potassium was so low and I now take 20 mEq of potassium daily as well as have blood tests every week to monitor my levels. My potassium now hovers around 4.3 and I've never felt better. I also eat a ton of spinach, baked potatoes and salmon, all of which are much higher in potassium than bananas.

Comment from: kat, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: January 24

I thought I had the flu. I ached all over but when I started having hallucinations I became really worried. Then I tried getting out of bed and found my legs were paralyzed! I called 911 immediately. In the emergency room (ER), after running tests, they found my potassium level was 248! They gave me oral liquid potassium and a potassium IV drip, as well as putting me on a heart monitor. They did an EKG but my heart was ok. After being in the ER all day I was released with 20 mEq of potassium to take per day. I am still taking them for my hypokalemia, although with the pills and good diet I can't get my potassium above 360! No reason yet on why but I was told I would have to take pills forever. I am so tired all the time, get leg burning cramps and racing heart. But nobody seems concerned!

Comment from: KEE-KEE, 35-44 Female (Patient) Published: September 20

I am a 43 year old female who is perfectly healthy, and never had and health issues. One day I started having tingling in my hands and never thought I would have had low potassium. I still didn't get checked out because it went away, so a month or so after I started to have palpitations and rapid heart-rate which caused me to go into supraventricular tachycardia (SVT). Thank goodness I was at work when it happened. They drew blood and found out my potassium was 3.0 which was low for me, so I was given a potassium and magnesium pill and was great after that.

Comment from: Paul, 55-64 Male (Patient) Published: August 18

I had several episodes of tachycardia, with my heart rate often exceeding 140 BPM with minimal activity. After numerous stress tests and nuclear scans found no problem with the cardiac system, my cardiologist looked at other possible causes. In reviewing my records he found I had consistently low potassium (hypokalemia). He prescribed oral potassium. Since then, I rarely have tachycardia. However, I still have it occasionally; usually when I'm being vigorous. I know what will trigger the episodes, but don't have a way to reload potassium during or after these activities.

Comment from: Precy, (Patient) Published: July 07

I felt dizzy, weak as if I didn't have enough strength, I didn't know what to do, my head and eyes were heavy, so I decided to go to my doctor, and he advised me to have my lab checkup. When I saw the results it was low potassium which is 3.46 and high uric acid 454.58 UMOL/L and my ALT (SGPT) U/L is 41.23, and all others are normal. I submitted the result next day, it happened every day especially in the morning after exercise.

Comment from: GARRETT77, 45-54 Female (Caregiver) Published: June 24

I am weak with explosive diarrhea due to ulcerative colitis, which has caused hypokalemia. My tongue has been tingling and I have a horrible metallic taste in my mouth. My muscles in my legs have also been twitching.

Comment from: Gerry, 55-64 Female (Caregiver) Published: June 01

My sister began having cramps in her fingers, rapid heart rate, breathlessness, slurred speech, and vomiting. She has been hospitalized three times now with potassium levels below 3. Due to the vomiting she has had to take potassium intravenously. Still potassium levels are low. Vomiting has stopped after third hospitalization but no reason offered for continued low potassium levels. She also has low magnesium, and low chloride levels. One doctor has attributed her present problems to the removal of one thyroid over 20 years ago. In addition to that she has huge ulcers on both sides her two legs. My concern is the apparent leaching of potassium from her body. No possible reasons given for the ulcers which had healed but reopened when she became ill recently.

Comment from: Crafter44, 65-74 Female (Patient) Published: May 17

I have not been diagnosed with hypokalemia (yet), but I have all the symptoms. I keep telling my doctor how tired I get, I get so tired that I cannot function, my body just doesn't want to move. When I am driving I will get so tired that my eyes will want to close, I have to force myself to keep the eyes open until I get to my destination. Then about an hour or so later I'll be fine. I have had blood clots in my left leg twice. My leg gets tired and sore in the locations where the blood clots were. My doctor just doesn't seem to listen to me. I don't sleep at night either. I have restless leg syndrome and sleep apnea. I am so tired, I know there is something wrong but no one goes that extra step to find it. I'm at my wits' end.

Comment from: Sikuku, 35-44 Female (Patient) Published: April 14

I thought I was having anxiety attacks. I felt like I couldn't catch my breath even though I was breathing fine. I had pain on the far left side of my chest, it started intermittently but then became constant. I felt like my heart was racing most of the time. If felt similar to indigestion also; a fullness at the level of the diaphragm. I was tired all the time. Just felt terrible. At this point, there is still no discernible cause for my hypokalemia.

Comment from: Kenairiverbandit, 45-54 Male (Patient) Published: March 23

I work as a roustabout in the oil and gas industry and many times find myself not taking breaks with the rest of the crew every 3 hours. That is a great time to rehydrate and or get some vitamins and minerals back into the body that were used up during the working period. Last weekend I didn't know if I was having a stroke or a heart attack or allergic reaction to something I ate. I woke my boss and the operations crew up early to get me a chopper ride right to the hospital. I was literally scared that I was going to die or wake up in the hospital not being able to speak or move one side of my body. I got to the hospital and after running the tests on my EKG, blood tests etc., the doctor tells me that the only thing he can find wrong was a low potassium level of 3.3. I felt all the symptoms that are listed in this website. We are all afforded the opportunity to eat right and take reasonable breaks. I am not one to visit the doctor unless something happens hence I don't go in for any once a year health exams. I am going to get annual checkups now and eat much better. I would suggest anybody with similar concerns be diligent in not letting their health slip. We guys don't need doctors until something happens. It may be too late when it does happen so get checked out once or more times, even if you think it is nothing.

Comment from: Mark Ranger, 55-64 Male (Patient) Published: March 22

Severe muscle-crush of legs induced low potassium until treatment after 3 years. I lost everything; businesses, home, family, friends. Later struggling in a hot country, Australia, to recoup some of my losses I lost potassium through high perspiration. I drank some 12 liters daily. I suffered severe symptoms; confusion, fatigue, arrhythmia, atrial fibrillation, clots, nerve damage, muscle pain, trembling, collapsed libido, and delayed tissue repair. This has prevented me from achieving much but failure in the face of determined struggle over 27 years. Yes I have self-medicated for 7 weeks and am recovering.

Comment from: No mo bloats!, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: October 15

I had chronic abdominal bloating and cramps, and tingling in fingers arms. Doctor arranged for me to have my potassium levels checked, and it showed that I was indeed low in potassium. For three weeks, I stopped taking a diuretic plus ate 2 bananas a day. I will have another check this week to ensure potassium level is back to normal.

Comment from: Gippy, 55-64 Male (Patient) Published: October 06

First I took blood pressure pills that reduced water. My potassium dropped (which I didn't know at the time). My heart went into SVTs (supraventricular tachycardia). My rate was immeasurable and could best be described as in a flutter. I was given Adenocard to reset my rhythm. I am glad it worked but very scary stuff. This happened 3 times over a month before it was found my potassium was low. I went back on beta blockers, problem solved. I had been sick, and I went into SVT. I stopped at drug store and took some potassium pills, and it cleared right up. I had diarrhea recently, again SVT, again potassium, again ok; so far!

Comment from: Mouse, 65-74 Female (Patient) Published: October 06

My symptoms of low potassium are rapid and erratic heartbeat. My heart beat will range from 95 to 130 beats and will change very rapidly, every second. I also experience dizziness. It started about 5 years ago while taking a diuretic. I had an episode today, and I took my potassium medication to stop it. I am also not currently taking diuretics.

Comment from: brenenpam, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: August 18

Low potassium was the cause of a lot of my aches and pains that I had been writing off as getting older. I take a high blood pressure pill with a water pill in it. This caused my potassium levels to drop to very low levels. I now take 30 mg of potassium a day so I don't I get the following symptoms. I have tiredness and swollen ankles, and my hips, shoulders and fingers hurt very badly. At times it is difficult to walk. My heart races while in bed. I don't notice it during the day. But as long as I keep up my 30 mg of potassium a day, I am fine.

Comment from: Deedee, 65-74 Female (Patient) Published: June 29

I had a cortisone shot for nerve pain in my back and leg. The next morning I was almost paralyzed. I was carried to the emergency room and could not walk or use my arms. I could barely lift a finger because of hypokalemia. They pumped potassium into my body for 4 days in ICU. I was in danger of my heart stopping. I went home and felt ill again so they put me back in the hospital for a few more days with too much potassium. Scary!

Comment from: NhsFailure , 25-34 Male (Patient) Published: February 27

I am usually admitted a few times in the year with dehydration through sickness. But this time my potassium was 3.3 and I ended up on drips for 3 days and then when checked again it was down to 3.1. And I started to get chest pains and shortness of breath, also lost all energy.

Comment from: Linda, 65-74 Female (Patient) Published: November 14

I was diagnosed with diastolic heart failure 10 days ago and placed on Lasix along with potassium and a strict diet with no more than 1400 to 2000 mg of sodium a day. Eleven days into my diagnosis and diet (since November 1 of 2017), I have experienced more muscle spasms than ever before, have begun coughing when I do not feel like I have any respiratory problems, and I am hurting like crazy in the kidney areas when I stand to wash dishes. July 30, I had a transient ischemic attack (mild stroke) and was prescribed a medicine which keeps platelets from forming plaque and breaking off, thus causing strokes. I am allergic to Coumadin, it nearly killed me. I have a great relationship with my doctor and can reach her via email at any time. Now, I have been told to take magnesium oxide 400 mg each day. But the problem is, both low counts of potassium and magnesium are the same. And today is Saturday and all is not well with me.

Comment from: paul, 19-24 (Patient) Published: August 29

From the age of 16, I have been having problems with my leg. Every time I went to school my leg was numb and weak, I don't really know what happened. We have no money to go to hospital. At age 17 I could not walk any more, the doctor said that I have a low potassium or hypokalemia, I am at age 23 now, and I am so depressed I don't know how I can survive.

Comment from: rufus, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: June 15

I have very bad muscle spasms. The doctor thinks it could be low potassium. After reading the symptoms, I think it fits because, I am bipolar and I am going through a manic episode right now. I thought that was because I stopped taking my Depakote. In 2 weeks he has scheduled me for a blood test to find out if I am low in potassium.

Comment from: vicky, 35-44 Female (Patient) Published: April 27

After giving birth I have been treated for low potassium treatment, as potassium was only 2.8. Potassium nitrate was given 3 times a day for 1 week. After 4 months now I am always have cramping of my legs and arms. But as of now I have not yet gone to a doctor for medications, because I feel nervous to know about my health conditions.

Comment from: Spouse, 55-64 Male (Caregiver) Published: March 24

The patient has had low potassium for 9 years with no apparent reason. No medications to cause this. It was not investigated by the general physician. He developed seizure disorder. Surgery to remove sclerosis area in brain thought to be reason. Post operation he had pneumonia. He was given blood thinner to prevent DVT (deep vein thrombosis) and began to hemorrhage from duodenum. Two months later he had Roux-en-Y surgery and died from bowel obstruction 5 months after initial surgery. Throughout hospital stay electrolyte replacements were required.

Comment from: DMMC, 25-34 Female (Caregiver) Published: October 13

My daughter was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 14. Since than she has been in and out of hospitals with low or high blood sugar. She is 30 now and while she was pregnant with her first child she developed gastroparesis where she can't tolerate liquids or food and vomits everything up. After the baby was born after 30 weeks healthy and normal, it seemed to disappear. Now the baby is 3 and it has started all over again. She's now in the hospital after numerous times with this and her potassium was so low they had to give her 6 IV bags of it and it is still low. They told her to try that V8 juice to see if it does anything once she's out. This is so scary because it seems there is no cure for this gastroparesis and she can't live a normal life and do things to enjoy her baby with. It is horrible seeing your child go through these things and there's nothing you can do about it.

Comment from: JLW, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: July 27

Severe dry mouth was my symptom of low potassium. I take stool softeners with laxative because of pain killer use. I also take small dose of water pill for swelling in legs.

Comment from: Rschillereff, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: June 29

This is the second time this has happened to me. My legs hurt and for some reason I could not hold my head up. I tried to drive home from work and kept falling asleep at the wheel and had to stop and pull over. My husband found me hours and hours later. I never heard my phone ring, nothing. I had taken a water pill because my legs were swollen and just now kind of figured out for myself that what had happened was hypokalemia.

Comment from: nor din, 65-74 Male (Patient) Published: June 09

I have had many cramps on my legs, typically on my right leg, when I wake up from sleep at night. Recently a friend and a doctor suggest to me that I might be low on potassium (hypokalemia). I know potassium is also found in bananas. I started eating a banana a day as a supplement to my diet. I seems to have no cramps on my leg, or anywhere so far.

Comment from: Jdb, 25-34 Male (Patient) Published: April 14

Low potassium can be caused by low magnesium. I had temporary paralysis of my right arm and couldn't hold my other arm above my head. After supplementing potassium powder with magnesium powder which can be purchased online I felt amazing. No more fatigue which was two years ongoing. No more limbs that felt heavy; or weakness in general. Potassium can be deadly if supplemented too fast and must be supplemented with large amounts of water to ensure we are not dehydrated but we require 4500 mg per day.

Comment from: Parsley127, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: July 29

I just spent 2 days in the hospital due to low potassium (hypokalemia). It caused me to faint after 15 to 20 minutes of feeling dizzy. It was diagnosed by ruling out everything else. Four CAT scans, dye injected into my veins, radioactive material injected into my veins, x-rays, an MRI, and too many blood tests to count, at least I can say that I know I'm healthy. Potassium pills cured me within a few minutes, once they found what it was.

Comment from: Linda, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: October 13

I have been losing potassium the past 12 years. Since April 2016 I have been in the hospital 4 times with the problem of hypokalemia. They have been given me potassium by vein and orally. I have adrenal gland disease and I take 40 mEq of potassium every day and I'm still losing, and seems like the doctors can't help me. I have done everything they have me to do. I don't know if it is my adrenal glands or my kidneys. I have PSVT (paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia).

Comment from: Shelz50, Female (Caregiver) Published: August 30

I am taking care of a woman who keeps ending up in the emergency room with low potassium. Her kidneys are fine she says.

Comment from: Mary, 25-34 Female (Patient) Published: October 13

I must see a cardio specialist because I am experiencing numbness and tingling in my right legs up to my stomach. Then I have a hard time breathing, and after that I feel dizzy and sleepy.

Comment from: ofentse B., 25-34 Female (Patient) Published: May 26

Normally when I try to stand up or walk I just feel some kind of sound is produced from my muscles and more often I feel very tired because of hypokalemia. Again when I touch people I choke and then I feel like I have touched electricity.

Comment from: Rumari, 65-74 Female (Caregiver) Published: May 13

My mother has been fighting pancreatic cancer for over a year now, and a recent lab work indicated a low potassium level of 3.2. Due to her condition doctor prescribed her some pills for hypokalemia and wants to follow up in a week. However, he asked us to keep an eye on her, and said if vomit or nausea, numbness or cramping was present, to take her to the emergency room immediately. Most likely her cancer caused this low potassium level.

Comment from: herself, 65-74 Female (Patient) Published: February 20

I have frequent reduction of blood pressure frequently causing 'out like a light'; seriously dizzy for unknown reasons. Finally a nurse mentioned electrolytes. I started drinking that exclusively and had only one event since them. I requested my primary care physician to order adrenal assay (just to cover all bases). Test result was 2.7. However, I had to do my own investigation in order to ask appropriate questions of doctors. Okay, so I now know my potassium level number but have no explanation for the situation.

Comment from: Reyna, 65-74 Female (Patient) Published: June 03

I never experienced problems with low potassium. Actually my potassium level was always at 4. One morning I woke up with severe stomach cramps, nauseated and sweating profusely. I did not get any better and my husband rushed me to the ER. By this time I could hardly get out of bed and when I did I passed out. I was very lethargic and not a clue what was going on around me. The ER doctor informed me that my potassium to a dangerous level 2.4. Finally by March 2014 my potassium was back to 4. Just now I found out my potassium is dropping again is at 3.3. Of course I am again under treatment, but I have not a clue what is causing my problem.

Comment from: nana102662, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: May 29

Starting with my hands, it went to my arms, chest, legs and then feet: All were tingly and started going numb. My heart was beating so hard and fast. My speech was slurred and my face was starting to feel numb and tingly. I was taken to the ER and by that time I couldn't lift my arms or legs. I couldn't smile or make any facial movements. My speech was very difficult for me. Bottom line, the CT & MRI showed no sign of stroke and blood work showed dangerously low potassium.

Comment from: nanna, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: May 20

I was in the hospital on with a potassium level of 1.9. I felt very weak. The ER doctor told me that my potassium was a very dangerous level and my EKG was normal. Today still feel weak. Now my right shin area is numb and is still holding fluid.

Comment from: sandirella, 65-74 Female (Patient) Published: November 05

I have not seen mention of water levels in the body. My feet and legs kept swelling and holding water. I was even having trouble breathing. I am chronically low on Potassium. The symptoms usually start with nausea, diarrhea and mind problems. Mine was a 2.2 the last time. I wound up in the hospital several times. I need to be on regular treatment due to my diet.

Comment from: teach329, 45-54 Female (Patient) Published: October 14

I went for blood work for my four-month follow up visit from my PCP. A few hours after the blood work, the doctor called me to say that I had 'dangerously low' potassium levels and that I should go to the Emergency Room to get an IV of potassium. Nine hours later and 2 bags of IV potassium, I was finally a 3.2.

Comment from: Boosis, 35-44 Female (Patient) Published: September 03

I was rushed by ambulance to hospital. My potassium level was zero. I had been suffering from cramping in my fingers and toes to start. Over the next few weeks, I lost all use of my arms and legs and had constant hallucinations. My mother dropped by on her way to work and found me collapsed on the floor of the bathroom. After a week in hospital they sent me for a CT scan and my heart stopped. After many tests, they still haven't diagnosed me. I still don't have full use of my arms and legs, and I can't walk. I have only been home from hospital for eight weeks but constant physio helps and I no longer have hallucinations.

REFERENCE:

Mount, David B. MD. "Clinical Manifestations and Treatment of Hypokalemia in Adults." UptoDate. Updated Jan 7, 2016.

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