Lung Cancer

Question:

What symptoms and signs did you experience with your lung cancer? Submit Your Comment

Comment from: Feeling Hopeless , 0-2 Female (Caregiver) Published: July 03

My mom 65 was diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer. It metastasized to her brain. She received the gamma knife procedure and eliminated all 6 tumors. The lungs were different. The cancer collapsed her upper right lung. She was hospitalized because of her breathing. It was downhill after that. Her lungs filled with fluid that kept having to be drained. She then developed blood clots. The medicine for the clots made her start bleeding from below. My mom died 12 days after being in the hospital.

Comment from: Dennytan, 65-74 Female (Caregiver) Published: April 24

I had constant cough and went to the emergency room. I was admitted with pneumonia but the doctor said there could be little spots on lungs, but she saw a big spot on the upper right lung. I am worried about lung cancer.

Comment from: KAY, 13-18 Female (Caregiver) Published: June 06

My child's symptoms of lung cancer are shortness of breath, night sweats, chest pain and frequent coughing. However, not everyone as a whole percentage of patients experience all of these symptoms, they may not know how painful it feels as others. Some, have very mild cases of lung cancer which doesn't cause much impact on their lungs as others may. With having my child with lung cancer, I haven't been in the brightest mood, and my child has been slowly dying which is very heart-wrenching. If I put myself in my child's shoes I wouldn't know how to handle such a case myself. I am a parent of 2 children but one died during birth.

Comment from: Jules, 55-64 Male (Caregiver) Published: September 01

We don't have confirmation of lung cancer yet as my 57 year old husband is going to CT scan on 23rd September. He went to the general physician (GP) as he had lost around 20 pounds in weight since beginning of summer and over the past 4 to 6 weeks some drastic muscle wasting. He wouldn't go to the doctors so I basically made the appointment and forced him. He said GP sent for bloodwork and referred to an oncologist. He doesn't have any other symptoms, just occasional whistle sound when he sleeps. I am more worried than he is and he just dismisses anything serious!

Comment from: John, 65-74 Male (Patient) Published: August 02

My doctors thought I had pneumonia for three months before deciding to do a CT scan. Now, my doctors tell me that I have lung cancer which disguised itself as many other problems. The prognosis is not good.

Comment from: Carlos carrizales, 65-74 Male (Patient) Published: August 02

The symptoms and signs of lung cancer were cough, fatigue, phlegm, shortness of breath, fever, chills, and I lost 6 pounds.

Comment from: 45-54 Female (Caregiver) Published: August 02

My mother-in-law is in the hospital now with stage IV cancer. She developed a cough a couple months ago, then mild shortness of breath, and then severe shortness of breath which led her to the hospital. It is already stage 4. She has it in her lungs (which one completely stopped working) and 5 places in her spine. I have no idea if this means she is going to die or if she has a chance. I'm worried. Her lungs keep swelling with fluid and she is becoming incontinent. She is on oxygen all the time now. She smoked for over 30 years. I smoke as well, but I'm so scared now that I'm planning on quitting. She has adenocarcinoma.

Comment from: Pro-Active, 65-74 Female (Caregiver) Published: August 02

I am amazed at some of these comments. We must all be pro-active in our health issues, regardless what they may be. When it comes to cancer especially, a second opinion is a must! No one should be satisfied with an answer of “Wait and see,” when there is even a slight sign of any kind of cancer. Wait and see? NO WAY! You get yourself to another doctor right away.

Comment from: wife, 55-64 Male (Caregiver) Published: August 02

My husband's physician of six years attributed his wheezing in chest, tiredness, chest discomfort to his weight and chronic bronchitis. As my husband grew more tired I thought he may have heart problems. I persuaded him to see a cardiologist. It was determined my husband had lung cancer stage 4.

Comment from: KRRT1966, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: August 02

I'm a 62 year-old female. When teaching I would cough and cough so I went to the doctor. I had a chest X-ray-April. It came back with a large mass in the right lobe, lung cancer-stage 3B. Now I am waiting for the treatment plan and pray that it will be successful.

Comment from: tklaroz, 55-64 Female (Caregiver) Published: August 02

My father who was a smoker for years but has not touched one since he had triple bypass surgery on his heart in 1983. He has been diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the lung, which started with a horrible cough. It seems his lungs were filling up with fluid and by the time we got him to see a doctor, we were told he had this terminal condition.

Comment from: Susan, 65-74 Female (Patient) Published: August 02

Hi - I'm a 65 year old female, smoked for 20 years, - 6 years ago, had a lung x-ray- then a needle biopsy and as it had not metastasized - within a month I was having a section of my right lung removed; a year later, another tumor so the remainder of the lobe in my right lung was removed; last year another tumor - so the remainder of my lung was removed. No other treatment except 6 month follow-ups. Surgery was not bad - first couple of days after were uncomfortable but I was always given pain control (which I rarely needed) - I am not a "survivor" -because I simply will not let lung cancer kill me.

Comment from: mbeach, 45-54 Female (Caregiver) Published: August 02

My brother in-law, a moderate smoker, had no cough, no blood, no chest pain or discomfort, just back pain. He went to the doctor--nothing, a few weeks later to the ER, where they also did nothing (no X-ray, just muscle relaxers and pain pills. About a month later my brother in-law, in desperation, went to a friend's chiropractor. After conversing with my brother in-law the chiropractor thought it would be wise to X-ray the back before doing an adjustment. Low and behold there was the culprit--several masses on the spine. The chiropractor asked for my brother in-law's medical doctor information, called the doctor and the rest is history. Unfortunately, my brother in-law passed within 5 months of diagnosis. One week shy of his only child's high school graduation. The point of my story (and I do have one) is to insist on an x-ray even though other symptoms aren't present. Again, his only symptom was excruciating back pain. He was 53 and in relatively good health. Thin/fit, strong with good vitals. Very sad.

Comment from: jackie, 35-44 Female (Patient) Published: August 02

I am a 44 year old female who gave up smoking 1 year before I was diagnosed with lung cancer. I didn't have the supposed symptoms. I had a swelling on the left side of my neck and after a biopsy was told the dreaded news. My doctors have been great explaining things to me and my husband: Although I have lung cancer my lungs are clear and all tumors are outside of lung, so I don't know what's in store for me.

Comment from: ritalogalbo, 55-64 Female (Patient) Published: August 02

I have been coughing up blood in my sputum. I have chest pain that goes to the back. They found a 5mm size spot on my lung. Now my doctor is waiting for 3 months before the biospy is done.

Comment from: Charles, 65-74 Male (Patient) Published: August 02

I am a 71-year old male who was diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the lung three years ago (2008). Though I had stopped smoking in 1985, my primary physician insisted on my having a screening spiral CT scan after several cases of bronchitis and pneumonia. Over the next two years I had three follow-up scans before cancer was diagnosed and confirmed with needle biopsy. I had a minimally invasive surgery and have been cancer free for two years eight months.

Comment from: one lunger, 45-54 Male (Patient) Published: August 02

In Dec. of 2009 went to PC physician for chronic bronchitis, and he suggested a chest X-ray. The X-ray showed a cloudy area in right upper lung. I went for CT scan, and on December 23 was informed it was a 4.5 cm tumor. I had a biopsy in January and it was confirmed. I had surgery in February, and the right lung was removed. I endured a very painful recovery, and in May I started preventative chemo. I lost 50 pounds, and was very sick until August when chemo treatments ended. I recovered from chemo, and recovery has been a success. Except for some excess phlegm and shortness of breath, I feel fine now. I had CT scan in September and declared cancer free, next one scheduled for June 2011. Of course I still worry about cancer coming back, but we are looking forward to many years ahead. Lung cancer is not a death sentence and can be beat, and a positive attitude makes all the difference. In my case I was lucky it was detected in time, just wish I had had that chest X-ray sooner.

Comment from: Arby, 75 or over Male (Patient) Published: August 02

In March of 2011 I was scheduled for a lumbar laminectomy and a pre-op chest x-ray disclosed a well-differentiated adenocarcinoma. A further PET scan disclosed a metastatic moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma in my left flank. I have not had any symptoms to date and have completed my first chemotherapy treatment with the second scheduled for next Monday (6/2011). I am dealing with a number of unpleasant side-effects at this time.

Comment from: george, 45-54 Male (Caregiver) Published: August 02

My dear wife of 25 years and 1 month died of lung cancer on October 23, 2009.her rotten ordeal with insidious cancer began in September 2006 emanating with excruciating pain in her shins. Within weeks of the onset of this suffering a specialist could not pinpoint a diagnosis that ranged from lupus to some sort of connective tissue disorder that may be one of 100strains of arthritis. With this lack of specific diagnosis pain pills and further blood testing were prescribed. At this point I regret not insisting on more specific X-rays and diagnostic procedures. In June of 2007 Kathy coincidently seemed to have contracted pneumonia and began being treated with antibiotics that further masked her disease. As the antibiotics did nothing in approx. 10 days and after coughing and hacking produced some signs of blood further x-rays were performed showing no dissipation of the pneumonia cloudiness. A few days into July Kathy became extremely weakened as we went to emergency at which time I insisted on her admittance for further testing. A bronchoscopy was done on July 18 as well as a syringe extraction of lymph matter. On our oldest son's 20th birthday July 30, 2007 we heard the result a confirmation of 4th stage terminal lung cancer. I will not blame healthcare services but in hindsight the pain, the clubbing finger nails, the number of classic symptoms maybe should have jumped out at somebody.

Comment from: toonie, Male (Caregiver) Published: August 02

My husband has just been diagnosed with lung cancer. He has had c.o.p.d. for 12 years and seen a pulmonologist regularly. The test show not only lung but bone, liver and lymph node involvement. We see a specialist next week and are very concerned. He had pain in his chest which is what lead to the CAT and PET scans. It looks like a long difficult treatment.

Patient Comments & Reviews

REFERENCES:

American Joint Committee on Cancer. "Lung Cancer Staging." <http://cancerstaging.org/references-tools/quickreferences/documents/lungmedium.pdf>.

Santacroce, Luigi. "Paraneoplastic Syndromes." Medscape.com. Aug. 13, 2014. <http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/280744-overview>.

United States. National Cancer Institute, U.S. National Institutes of Health. "What You Need to Know About Lung Cancer." July 2012. <http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/types/lung>.

Health Solutions From Our Sponsors