Font Size
A
A
A

Migraine Headache (cont.)

How Can I Prevent Migraines?

Migraine triggers should be identified and avoided. Making individual lifestyle changes is very important. Changes may include avoiding certain types of foods and certain emotional situations. If missing meals triggers headaches, the person should make every effort to eat on a regular basis. In some instances, the use of biofeedback may help reduce the severity and frequency of attacks.

What's the Outlook for a Person with Migraines?

Regular follow-up care with a doctor or other health care professional is a must. Keep a pain journal to monitor the frequency of attacks and the medications you use can be very helpful. It may take several doctor visits before an effective treatment plan is found.

After the headaches are under control, the prognosis is very good. Patience is key. As noted previously, it may take several attempts before an effective treatment plan is found.

No one treatment or drug is effective for every person. A drug that works well for one patient may not provide any relief for another. A combination of different medications is sometimes needed to treat resistant headaches.

What Does Migraine Headache Look Like (Pictures)

Example of a visual migraine aura as described by a person who experiences migraines. 
This patient reported that these visual auras preceded her headache by 20 to 30 minutes.
Example of a visual migraine aura as described by a person who experiences migraines. This patient reported that these visual auras preceded her headache by 20 to 30 minutes.

Example of a central scotoma as described by a person who experiences migraines. Note the visual loss in the center of vision.
Example of a central scotoma as described by a person who experiences migraines. Note the visual loss in the center of vision.

Another example of a central scotoma as described by a person who experiences migraine headaches.
Another example of a central scotoma as described by a person who experiences migraine headaches.

Example of visual changes during migraine. Multiple spotty scotomata as described by a person who experiences migraines.
Example of visual changes during migraine. Multiple spotty scotomata as described by a person who experiences migraines.
Frank visual field loss can occur with migraine. This example shows loss of the entire right visual field as described by a person who experiences migraines.
Frank visual field loss can occur with migraine. This example shows loss of the entire right visual field as described by a person who experiences migraines.

REFERENCES:

Jasvinder, C. "Migraine Headache" Medscape. Updated: Jun 22, 2016.
<http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1142556-overview>

American Headache Society. "New Guidelines: Treatments Can Help Prevent Migraine." Update: May 01, 2016.
<https://americanheadachesociety.org/news/new-guidelines-treatments-can-help-prevent-migraine-2/>


Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 9/11/2017

Must Read Articles Related to Migraine Headache

5 Types of Headaches
5 Types of Headaches There are five main types of headaches including migraines, cluster headaches, tension headaches, sinus headaches, and mixed headaches. Knowing what kind of hea...learn more >>
Migraine and Related Headaches
Causes and Treatments of Migraine Headaches Two general types of headaches exist: primary (like migraines and cluster headaches) and secondary (headaches caused by a structural problem, trauma, or infecti...learn more >>

Patient Comments & Reviews

The eMedicineHealth doctors ask about Migraine Headache:

Migraine Headache - Cause

What caused your migraine headache?

Migraine Headache - Experience

Please share your experience with migraine headache.

Migraine Headache - Effective Treatments

What kinds of treatments have been effective for your migraine headache?

Migraine Headache - Symptoms

What were the symptoms of your migraine headache?


Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Migraine Headache »

Migraines are severe, throbbing headaches frequently located in the temples or frontal head regions.

Read More on Medscape Reference »


Medical Dictionary