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Nail Psoriasis

Nail Psoriasis Facts

Psoriasis is a common chronic skin condition. A person with psoriasis typically has patches of raised, red skin with silvery scales. The affected skin may look shiny and red or even have pustules, depending on the type of psoriasis. These skin changes usually occur on the elbows, knees, scalp, and trunk. In the United States, over 3% of people have psoriasis. Psoriasis can also affect the fingernails and toenails, leading to thick fingernails with pitting, ridges in the nails, nail lifting away from the nail bed, and irregular contour of the nail.

Most people with psoriasis of the nails also have skin psoriasis (cutaneous psoriasis). Only 5% of people with psoriasis of the nails do not have skin psoriasis. In those with skin psoriasis, 10%-55% have psoriasis of the nails (also called psoriatic nail disease), but it has been estimated that up to 80% of people with psoriasis will have nail involvement at some point in their lifetime. About 10%-20% of people who have skin psoriasis also have psoriatic arthritis, a specific inflammatory joint condition in which people have symptoms of both arthritis and psoriasis. Of people with psoriatic arthritis, 53%-86% have affected nails, often with pitting.

Untreated severe nail psoriasis can lead to functional and social problems.

Medically Reviewed by a Doctor on 9/11/2017

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Patient Comments & Reviews

The eMedicineHealth doctors ask about Nail Psoriasis:

Nail Psoriasis - Symptoms

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Nail Psoriasis - Treatment

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Psoriasis Medications

Since psoriasis is incurable, the selection of treatment plans must consider the long-term outlook. Treatment options depend on the extent and severity as well as the emotional response to the disease. They include topical agents (drugs applied to the skin), phototherapy (controlled exposure to ultraviolet light), and systemic agents (orally, intravenously, or percutaneously administered agents). All of these treatments may be used alone or in combination with one another.


Read What Your Physician is Reading on Medscape

Psoriasis, Nails »

Psoriatic nail disease has many clinical signs.

Read More on Medscape Reference »


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