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Panax Pseudoginseng

What other names is Panax Pseudoginseng known by?

Aralia pseuodoginseng, Chai-Jen-Shen, Field Seven, Ginseng de Los Himalayas, Ginseng Himalayen, Ginseng du Népal, Himalayan Ginseng, Jia Renshen, Nepal Ginseng, Noto-Gin, Notoginseng, Panax notoginseng, Panax notoginseng radix, Panax zingiberensis, Pseudoginseng Panax, Pseudoginseng Root, Racine de Pseudoginseng, Sanchi, Samch'll, Sanchitongtshu, San Qi, San-Qi Ginseng, San Qui, Sanchitongtshu, Sanqi, Sanqi Powder, Sanshichi, Three Seven, Tian Qi, Tian San Qi, Tienchi, Tienchi Ginseng.

What is Panax Pseudoginseng?

Panax pseudoginseng is a plant. The root is used to make medicine. Be careful not to confuse panax pseudoginseng with other forms of ginseng, such as panax ginseng.

Panax pseudoginseng is used to stop or slow down bleeding. It is sometimes taken by people who have nosebleeds, vomit up or cough up blood, or find blood in their urine or feces.

Panax pseudoginseng is also used to relieve pain; and to reduce swelling, cholesterol, and blood pressure. It is also used for chest pain (angina), strokes, dizziness, and sore throat.

Some people apply Panax pseudoginseng directly to the skin to stop bleeding.

In combination with seven other herbs (PC-SPES), Panax pseudoginseng is used to treat prostate cancer.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of Panax pseudoginseng for these uses.

How does Panax Pseudoginseng work?

Panax pseudoginseng might relax blood vessels, which would improve blood flow and reduce blood pressure. There isn't enough information to know how Panax pseudoginseng might work for prostate cancer and other conditions.

Are there safety concerns?

There isn't enough information to know whether Panax pseudoginseng is safe. It can cause some side effects such as dry mouth, flushed skin, nervousness, sleep problems, nausea, and vomiting.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Don't take Panax pseudoginseng if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. It is UNSAFE. One of the chemicals in Panax ginseng has caused birth defects in research animals.

Hormone-sensitive conditions such as breast cancer, uterine cancer, ovarian cancer, endometriosis, or uterine fibroids: Panax pseudoginseng might act like estrogen. If you have any condition that might be made worse by exposure to estrogen, don't use Panax pseudoginseng.

Dosing considerations for Panax Pseudoginseng.

The appropriate dose of Panax pseudoginseng depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for Panax pseudoginseng. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

QUESTION

Next to red peppers, you can get the most vitamin C from ________________. See Answer

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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Reviewed on 9/17/2019
References

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