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Pellitory-Of-The-Wall

What other names is Pellitory-of-the-wall known by?

Casse-Pierre, Casse-Pierres, Espargoule, Gamberoussette, Herbe à Bouteille, Herbe au Verre, Lichwort, Pariétaire, Pariétaire Officinale, Parietaria, Parietaria officinalis, Passe-Muraille, Pellitory of the Wall, Perce-Muraille.

What is Pellitory-of-the-wall?

Pellitory-of-the-wall is a plant. Its name comes from its habit of growing in old walls and dry, stony areas. The parts of the plant that grow above the ground are used to make medicine.

People take pellitory-of-the-wall for fluid retention, constipation, and cough. They also take it for a variety of urinary tract disorders including urinary tract infections (UTIs), kidney pain, and kidney stones.

Sometimes people apply pellitory-of-the-wall directly to the skin for treating burns and wounds.

Be careful not to confuse pellitory-of-the-wall with pellitory, which is a different plant.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of pellitory-of-the-wall for these uses.

How does Pellitory-of-the-wall work?

There isn't enough information to know how pellitory-of-the-wall might work.

Are there safety concerns?

Pellitory-of-the-wall might be safe for most people to take by mouth, but the possible side effects of pellitory-of-the-wall are not known.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Not enough is known about the use of pellitory-of-the-wall during pregnancy and breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Dosing considerations for Pellitory-of-the-wall.

The appropriate dose of pellitory-of-the-wall depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for pellitory-of-the-wall. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

QUESTION

Next to red peppers, you can get the most vitamin C from ________________. See Answer

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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Reviewed on 9/17/2019
References

Chevallier A. Encyclopedia of Herbal Medicine. 2nd ed. New York, NY: DK Publ, Inc., 2000.

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