Solomon's Seal

Other Name(s):

Dropberry, Faux Muguet, Genouillet, Herbe aux Panaris, Herbe à la Rupture, Lady's Seals, Polygonatum multiflorum, Sceau de Salomon, Sealroot, Sealwort, Sello de Salomón, Solomon Seal, St. Mary's Seal.

Overview

Solomon's seal is an herb. It is used to make medicine.

Solomon's seal is used to treat lung disorders, reduce swelling (inflammation), and to dry out tissue and draw it together (as an astringent).

Some people apply Solomon's seal directly to the skin for bruises, ulcers, or boils on the fingers, hemorrhoids, skin redness, and water retention (edema).

How does it work?

Solomon's seal contains chemicals that might decrease blood sugar levels.

Uses & Effectiveness

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

TAKEN BY MOUTH

  • Lung disorders.
  • Swelling (inflammation).
  • Other conditions.
APPLIED TO THE SKIN

More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of Solomon's seal for these uses.

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

QUESTION

Next to red peppers, you can get the most vitamin C from ________________. See Answer

Side Effects

Solomon's seal is safe for most adults when taken for short time periods. It can cause some side effects such as diarrhea, stomach complaints, and nausea when taken for long time periods or in large doses.

Special Precautions & Warnings

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: not enough is known about the use of solomon's seal during pregnancy and breast-feeding. stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Diabetes: Solomon's seal might decrease blood sugar levels. There is some concern that it might interfere with blood sugar control. If you use Solomon's seal and take diabetes medications, monitor your blood sugar closely.

Surgery: Solomon's seal might lower blood sugar levels. There s a concern that it might interfere with blood sugar control during and after surgery. Stop using Solomon's seal at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Interactions


Chlorpropamide (Diabinese)Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.Talk with your health provider.

Chlorpropamide (Diabinese) is used to decrease blood sugar in people with diabetes. Solomon's seal might also decrease blood sugar. Taking Solomon's seal along with chlorpropamide (Diabinese) might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your chlorpropamide (Diabinese) might need to be changed.


InsulinInteraction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.Talk with your health provider.

Solomon's seal might decrease blood sugar. Insulin is also used to decrease blood sugar. Taking Solomon's seal along with insulin might cause your blood sugar to be too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your insulin might need to be changed.


Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs)Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.Talk with your health provider.

Solomon's seal might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking Solomon's seal along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.

Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

SLIDESHOW

Vitamin D Deficiency: How Much Vitamin D Is Enough? See Slideshow

Dosing

The appropriate dose of Solomon's seal depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for Solomon's seal. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

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Reviewed on 6/14/2021
References

Brinker F. Herb Contraindications and Drug Interactions. 2nd ed. Sandy, OR: Eclectic Medical Publications, 1998.

Gruenwald J, Brendler T, Jaenicke C. PDR for Herbal Medicines. 1st ed. Montvale, NJ: Medical Economics Company, Inc., 1998.

McGuffin M, Hobbs C, Upton R, Goldberg A, eds. American Herbal Products Association's Botanical Safety Handbook. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, LLC 1997.

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