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Sweet Woodruff

What other names is Sweet Woodruff known by?

Aspérula, Asperula odorata, Aspérule, Aspérule Odorante, Galii Odorati Herba, Galium odoratum, Master of the Wood, Petit Muguet, Reine des Bois, Thé Suisse, Waldmeister, Woodruff, Wordward.

What is Sweet Woodruff?

Sweet woodruff is an herb. The parts that grow above the ground are used to make medicine, though medicinal use has tapered off in many countries around the world.

People take sweet woodruff for preventing and treating lung, stomach, liver, gallbladder, and urinary disorders. They also use it for heart problems, “blood purification,” “weak veins,” and other circulation problems.

Other uses include treating restlessness, agitation, hysteria, and trouble sleeping (insomnia). Sweet woodruff is sometimes used to relieve nerve pain (neuralgia) and migraine; cause sweating; loosen chest congestion; and increase the flow of urine to relieve water retention.

Some people apply sweet woodruff directly to the affected areas for skin diseases, wounds, vein problems, hemorrhoids, and swelling.

In foods and beverages, sweet woodruff is used as a flavoring.

In manufacturing, the extracts of sweet woodruff are used as fragrance in perfumes.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • Lung disorders.
  • Stomach problems.
  • Liver and gallbladder ailments.
  • Urinary tract disorders.
  • Heart problems.
  • Nervousness.
  • Hemorrhoids.
  • Sleeplessness.
  • Migraines.
  • Water retention.
  • Skin problems.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of sweet woodruff for these uses.

How does Sweet Woodruff work?

Sweet woodruff contains ingredients that can help decrease swelling (inflammation) and kill germs.

Are there safety concerns?

Sweet woodruff is LIKELY SAFE in when consumed in amounts normally found in food. It is POSSIBLY SAFE when used in medicinal amounts, short-term. Sweet woodruff can cause headaches, blackouts, and liver damage when used long-term.

Not enough is known about the safety of putting sweet woodruff on the skin.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking sweet woodruff if you are pregnant or breast-feeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use.

Bleeding disorder: Sweet woodruff contains certain chemicals that might slow blood clotting. This might increase the risk of bruising and bleeding in people with bleeding disorders.

Surgery: Sweet woodruff contains certain chemicals that might slow blood clotting. It might cause extra bleeding during and after surgery. Stop using sweet woodruff at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

Are there any interactions with medications?


Medications that slow blood clotting (Anticoagulant / Antiplatelet drugs)Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination.Talk with your health provider.

Sweet woodruff contains chemicals that might slow blood clotting. Using sweet woodruff with medications that slow clotting may increase the risk of bleeding.

Some of these drugs include aspirin, clopidogrel (Plavix), dalteparin (Fragmin), dipyridamole (Persantine), enoxaparin (Lovenox), heparin, ticlopidine (Ticlid), warfarin (Coumadin), and others.

Dosing considerations for Sweet Woodruff.

The appropriate dose of sweet woodruff depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for sweet woodruff. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

QUESTION

Next to red peppers, you can get the most vitamin C from ________________. See Answer

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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Reviewed on 9/17/2019
References

Brown, D. Encyclopaedia of Herbs and their Uses. 1995.

Chevallier, A. The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants. 1996.

Grieve. A Modern Herbal. 1984.

Kovac-Besovic, E. E. and Duric, K. Thin layer chromatography-application in qualitative analysis on presence of coumarins and flavonoids in plant material. Bosn.J Basic Med.Sci. 2003;3(3):19-26. View abstract.

Stuart, M. The Encyclopedia of Herbs and Herbalism. 1979.

Wierzchowska-Renke, K. [Study of the content of 1-ascorbic acid in the herb Asperulae odoratae L. depending on the stage of its development in the period of vegetation]. Acta Pol.Pharm 1969;26(2):181-185. View abstract.

Dukes JA. CRC Handbook of Medicinal Herbs. first ed. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, Inc., 1985.

Electronic Code of Federal Regulations. Title 21. Part 182 -- Substances Generally Recognized As Safe. Available at: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?CFRPart=182

Sulma, T. and Wierzchowska, K. [Studies on the content of coumarin in the herbs of the woodruff (Herba Asperulae odoratae) throughout the vegetative period of the plant.]. Acta Pol.Pharm 1963;20:77-82. View abstract.

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