What Are the Symptoms of Hyperthyroidism in Females?

Reviewed on 9/13/2021

Thyroid disease tends to happen more often in women than in men, and their symptoms can vary. Symptoms of hyperthyroidism in females that differ from males include changes in menstrual periods (lighter flow), less frequent periods, missed menstrual periods, infertility, hot flashes, and mood swings.
Thyroid disease tends to happen more often in women than in men, and their symptoms can vary. Symptoms of hyperthyroidism in females that differ from males include changes in menstrual periods (lighter flow), less frequent periods, missed menstrual periods, infertility, hot flashes, and mood swings.

Hyperthyroidism (also called overactive thyroid) occurs when the thyroid gland in the neck produces too much thyroid hormone and increases the body’s metabolism. Thyroid disease occurs more often in women than in men. 

Hyperthyroidism is not the same as hypothyroidism, which is when a person produces too little thyroid hormone. 

Some people with hyperthyroidism may have no symptoms. 

When they do occur, symptoms of hyperthyroidism in both females and males may include:

Symptoms of hyperthyroidism in females also include: 

  • Changes in menstrual periods, such as lighter flow 
  • Less frequent periods
  • Missed menstrual periods
  • Infertility
  • Hot flashes
  • Mood swings

What Causes Hyperthyroidism?

Graves' disease, a condition in which the immune system produces an antibody that stimulates the thyroid gland to produce too much thyroid hormone, is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism.

Other causes of hyperthyroidism include: 

  • Thyroid nodules (small growths or lumps in the thyroid gland) 
    • Called a hot nodule, toxic nodule, when there is a single nodule, or, a toxic nodular goiter when there is more than one nodule
  • Painless (“silent or lymphocytic”) thyroiditis, a condition in which the thyroid becomes temporarily inflamed and releases thyroid hormone into the bloodstream
  • Postpartum thyroiditis which can occur several months after delivery
  • Subacute (granulomatous) thyroiditis, thought to be caused by a virus
  • Taking excess thyroid hormone medication for hypothyroidism 
  • Consuming foods or medicines that contain high levels of iodine 

How Is Hyperthyroidism Diagnosed?

Hyperthyroidism is diagnosed with blood tests that measure the amount of thyroid hormone and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). 

Other tests may include: 

  • Thyroid scan 
  • Blood test to help determine the cause of hyperthyroidism (such as Graves' disease, toxic nodular goiter, or thyroiditis)

How Is Hyperthyroidism Treated?

Treatment for hyperthyroidism includes: 

SLIDESHOW

Hyperthyroidism Symptoms and Treatment See Slideshow

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Reviewed on 9/13/2021
References
https://www.uptodate.com/contents/hyperthyroidism-overactive-thyroid-beyond-the-basics?search=Hyperthyroidism&topicRef=15437&source=see_link

https://familydoctor.org/condition/hyperthyroidism/

https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/thyroid-disorders-in-women