Why Do Men Feel Pain During Intercourse?

Reviewed on 8/26/2021

Pain during sex for men only happens when something is wrong. Possible reasons for painful intercourse in men include infection (thrush, STIs), allergic reactions, a tight foreskin, small tears in the foreskin, inflammation, testicular pain and swelling, and prolonged erection (priapism).
Pain during sex for men only happens when something is wrong. Possible reasons for painful intercourse in men include infection (thrush, STIs), allergic reactions, a tight foreskin, small tears in the foreskin, inflammation, testicular pain and swelling, and prolonged erection (priapism).

Men should not feel pain during sexual intercourse unless something is wrong. 

If a man experiences pain during intercourse, there are a number of possible causes, such as: 

  • Infection
  • Allergic reactions 
    • Spermicide 
    • Latex 
  • A tight foreskin 
  • Small tears in the foreskin that may not be visible
  • Inflammation of the head of the penis (balanitis)
  • Irritation from previous sexual activity or other non-sexual activities 
  • Inflammation of the prostate gland (prostatitis)
  • Testicular pain and swelling 
  • Prolonged erection (priapism) 
    • Priapism is a medical emergency – see a doctor if you experience an erection that lasts more than 4 hours

What Is the Treatment for Men Who Have Pain During Intercourse?

Treatment for men who have pain during intercourse depends on the cause. 

  • Infection
  • Allergic reactions 
    • Avoid the product that is causing the reaction
  • A tight foreskin 
    • Stretching exercises
    • Topical steroids
    • Surgery to remove the foreskin
  • Small tears in the foreskin that may not be visible
    • Most of the time, it will heal on its own 
    • Clean well, apply moisturizer as directed by a doctor
    • Use lubrication when you have intercourse
  • Inflammation of the head of the penis (balanitis)
    • Depending on the cause: 
      • Antifungal cream
      • Antibiotics
      • Topical steroids
  • Irritation from previous sexual activity or other non-sexual activities 
    • Avoid sexual activity or any other irritating activity until the pain subsides
    • Use lubrication when you have intercourse
  • Inflammation of the prostate gland (prostatitis)
    • If the condition is acute
    • If the condition is chronic
      • Medications to reduce pain and inflammation
      • Alpha-blockers such as tamsulosin (Flomax) and silodosin (Rapaflo) to relax the muscles in the prostate and part of the bladder
      • Lifestyle changes
        • Warm baths
        • Relaxation exercises
        • Physical therapy 
      • Surgery
  • Testicular pain and swelling 
    • Depends on the cause and may include: 
      • Pain medications
      • Antibiotics
      • Rest
      • Ice
      • Scrotal support
      • Surgery
  • Prolonged erection (priapism)
    • At home: 
      • Try to urinate
      • Take a warm bath or shower
      • Drink plenty of water
      • Go for an easy walk
      • Exercise: climb stairs, run in place, squats
      • Use over-the-counter (OTC) pain medications
    • If an erection lasts more than 4 hours, go to a hospital where treatment may include:
      • Drugs injected directly into the penis
      • Draining blood from the penis using a needle 
      • Shunt surgery 

QUESTION

Condoms are the best protection from sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). See Answer

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Reviewed on 8/26/2021
References
https://www.nhs.uk/common-health-questions/sexual-health/why-does-sex-hurt/

https://www.uptodate.com/contents/balanitis-in-adults?search=Balanitis&source=search_result&selectedTitle=1~61&usage_type=default&display_rank=1#H19

https://www.nhs.uk/common-health-questions/mens-health/what-should-i-do-if-my-penis-is-torn/

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/prostate-problems

https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/urologic-diseases/prostate-problems

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/436154-overview

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/2036003-overview

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/priapism-painful-erections/