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Wood Sorrel

What other names is Wood Sorrel known by?

Acederilla, Aleluya, Alléluia, Cuckoo Bread, Cuckowes Meat, Fairy Bells, Green Sauce, Hallelujah, Herbe aux Coucous, Mountain Sorrel, Oseille des Bois, Oxalide des Bois, Oxalide Petite Oseille, Oxalis, Oxalis acetosella, Oxalis des Bois, Oxalis montana, Oxalis Petite Oseille, Pain-de-Coucou, Petite Oseille, Shamrock, Sour Trefoil, Stickwort, Stubwort, Surelle, Three-Leaved Grass, White Sorrel, Wood Sour.

What is Wood Sorrel?

Wood sorrel is a plant. The whole flowering plant is used to make medicine.

Despite safety concerns, people take wood sorrel for liver and digestive disorders, a condition caused by lack of vitamin C (scurvy), wounds, and swollen gums.

Don't confuse wood sorrel with sorrel.

Insufficient Evidence to Rate Effectiveness for...

  • Liver problems.
  • Digestion problems.
  • Wounds.
  • Vitamin C deficiency (scurvy).
  • Gum swelling.
  • Other conditions.
More evidence is needed to rate the effectiveness of wood sorrel for these uses.

How does Wood Sorrel work?

There isn't enough information to know how wood sorrel works.

Are there safety concerns?

Wood sorrel is UNSAFE, especially when used when used in higher doses. Wood sorrel can cause diarrhea, nausea, increased urination, skin reactions, stomach and intestine irritation, eye damage, and kidney damage. Swelling of the mouth, tongue, and throat can make speaking and breathing difficult.

Taking wood sorrel by mouth can lead to crystals forming in the blood and depositing in the kidneys, blood vessels, heart, lungs, and liver.

Special Precautions & Warnings:

While wood sorrel isn't safe for anyone, some people are at even greater risk for serious side effects. Be especially careful not give wood sorrel to children or take it yourself if you have any of the following conditions.

Children: It is UNSAFE give wood sorrel to children. It contains crystals made of oxalic acid that can damage the organs. One four-year old child died after eating rhubarb leaves, which also contain oxalic acid.

Pregnancy and breast-feeding: Wood sorrel is UNSAFE for both mothers and infants. Avoid use.

Blood-clotting (coagulation) problems: Chemicals in wood sorrel can make blood clot too fast.

Stomach or intestinal disorders: Wood sorrel can irritate the lining of the stomach and intestines and might make ulcers worse.

Kidney disease: The oxalic acid crystals in wood sorrel can damage the kidney and make existing kidney disease worse.

Dosing considerations for Wood Sorrel.

The appropriate dose of wood sorrel depends on several factors such as the user's age, health, and several other conditions. At this time there is not enough scientific information to determine an appropriate range of doses for wood sorrel. Keep in mind that natural products are not always necessarily safe and dosages can be important. Be sure to follow relevant directions on product labels and consult your pharmacist or physician or other healthcare professional before using.

QUESTION

Next to red peppers, you can get the most vitamin C from ________________. See Answer

Natural Medicines Comprehensive Database rates effectiveness based on scientific evidence according to the following scale: Effective, Likely Effective, Possibly Effective, Possibly Ineffective, Likely Ineffective, and Insufficient Evidence to Rate (detailed description of each of the ratings).

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Reviewed on 9/17/2019
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